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Interesting - But I have a few questions

I have a few questions about the Norton Core that I've thus far been unable to find answers to in the current product announcement publications.

  1. Is this a true security appliance - for instance; is it functionally akin to the entry-level SonicWALL appliances?
  2. Will the Core product(s) eventually support large-area Wi-Fi coverage (i.e., homes/properties > 5,000sq ft.)
    • If so - Will this be accomplished as a MESH configuration via satellite access points permitting common/shared SSIDs across all points of Wi-Fi access?
  3. Does the Core support VLANs on either Wi-Fi or wired LAN ports?
  4. Does the Core support Guest-mode Wi-Fi access?
  5. Does the Core support client device MAC filtering (access control)?
    • If so - Is this supported on both Wi-Fi and (wired) LAN ports?
  6. Does the Core allow configurable LAN-segment segregations?

Thanks for your time 

Antworten

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Re: Interesting - But I have a few questions

Sorry for the very late response. I would be guessing at most of this and was hoping others might chime in. 

Let's see if @Gayathri_R can fill in the details for you.

Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
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Re: Interesting - But I have a few questions

Hi Peter,

I realize these inquiries (and I do have others,) are rather precise and somewhat technical in their nature - Perhaps such specifications are yet a bit too diaphanous therefore making it also too early (for Symantec/Norton) to begin "hard-defining" what will ultimately become the actual device.

And I'm in no great hurry here...

Please consider my post as just a bit of time that I have spent fishing on a leisurely day.

Thanks for the response!

John

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Re: Interesting - But I have a few questions

Hi John

If they are going to ship by summer, I would think that it would be pretty much locked down by now. 

It still remains to be seen if it is actually any more secure than a properly secured router.

Peter

Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
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Re: Interesting - But I have a few questions

I'm in total agreement with both of your statements Peter... But of course my agreement does have its minor confine; That being the predication that they are managing to remain on track with their anticipated production schedule. 

Cheers!

John

Akzeptierte Lösung
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Re: Interesting - But I have a few questions

Hi,

Sorry for the delayed response. But here they are:

1. Yes, it is a true security appliance that does Deep Packet Inspection (DPI) to detect and block malware. 
2. Yes, Core will eventually be able to support large-area Wi-Fi coverage through a Mesh configuration. 
3. Core does not support user configurable VLANS. 
4. Yes, with timeout settings. 
5. Core supports MAC filtering by allowing customer to blacklist devices, instead of whitelisting. Customers can blacklist devices that are both wired as well as on Wi-Fi. 
6. The only network segregation that Core allows is by the Wi-Fi bands – 2.4GHz and 5GHz. 

Thanks,
Gayathri 

Gayathri R | Norton Forums Global Community Administrator | Symantec Corporation
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Re: Interesting - But I have a few questions

Hi Gayathri,

Thank you very kindly for your very precise and itemized response. Nearly all of the items covered in your response (excepting two,) were definitely very good news, especially considering the price-point for such a device.

I was sorry to hear of Norton/Symantec's election not to implement true VLANs on the device - Of course this can be partially mediated (for wired LAN devices) by employing a smart/managed switch with VLAN implementation between the wired devices and the Core router, though unfortunately it still leaves Wi-Fi VLANs rather troublesome/costly to implement.

I was also sorry to hear of the decision to implement the Core's access control (posture mode) solely on remedial Blacklisting - e.g., assume all new LAN/Wi-Fi clients (devices) are welcome on the network until otherwise Blacklisted by an Admin. FWIW, Netgear routers permit Admin(s) to choose the default operational mode for such posturing; either A) assume good until blacklisted - or B) assume bad until whitelisted (which is my preferred election). However - since this function would likely be soft-implemented (in the Core's FW) rather than hard-implemented (in its HW), perhaps the possibility of an "access control mode" (option switch) may still be a candidate for future reconsideration?

Thank you again for your generous response,

John

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Re: Interesting - But I have a few questions

Quick follow-up questions about the Core's Guest Access mode(s)...

  1. Besides its Wi-Fi interface, can the Core's Guest Access (isolations) also be effected on its 3 wired LAN ports?
  2. Besides Guested restrictions on accessing the "Trusted Network", can Guests also be fully sandboxed (isolated from accessing one another)?
    • If so, how about on a selective (individualized) basis (e.g., The ability to designate which Guests may and which Guests may not, access one another)?
  3. Can Guests be granted access to certain specific "trusted network" resources/devices (e.g. trusted printers, etc.)?

Many thanks,

John

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Re: Interesting - But I have a few questions

I was seriously interested in the Norton Core (ready to pre-order) until I read in this forum thread that the Core does not support whitelisted MAC addresses. I am not very knowledgeable in this area but it seems to me that (1) whitelisting is a more secure mechanism than blacklisting (only allow these devices and no others) and (2) it is much easier for me (the Admin) to keep track of and manage the known devices I want to allow in the network instead of trying to manage the unknown devices I want to keep out of my network. 

How is blacklisting better than whitelisting in this case, in the Norton Core?

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Re: Interesting - But I have a few questions

I already pre-ordered the Norton Core and now that I know that it does not support user-configured vLANs, it will be useless in my network. I need to get get rid of it now.

How can a security router not support user-configured vLANs?!

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Re: Interesting - But I have a few questions

How can a security router not support user-configured vLANs?!

Engineering departments are often hampered by marketing, legal, and just plain business decisions. Don't try to figure it out. Just choose a product that will fill your needs. 

I can only guess that in most home use scenarios, there would be no need for vLANS. And as always, Norton products are aimed at the home user, set and forget market. And, yes, I do know that more knowledgeable users are always going to be drawn to these products, and they have found and worked around the short comings in the past.

If you are not already aware of the cancellation process, see this Core FAQ and check the How do I cancel my pre order section.

Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
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Re: Interesting - But I have a few questions

Thanks peterweb. I notice that the Core has a Guest Network feature. If it's like Apple Airport Extreme's guest network, it would simply be using a vLAN. By chance, would that vLAN id happen to be 1003? If so, I may not have to cancel the order, just modify my network design a bit (essentially, it would be my shot at working around the lack of user-configured vLANs). If not, what's the extent of its use in the Core?

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Re: Interesting - But I have a few questions

 I notice that the Core has a Guest Network feature. If it's like Apple Airport Extreme's guest network, it would simply be using a vLAN.

Perhaps an admirable decision by programmers/marketing to use language the typical user is likely to understand!

Instead of:

A VLAN is a group of devices on one or more LANs that are configured to communicate as if they were attached to the same wire, when in fact they are located on a number of different LAN segments. Because VLANs are based on logical instead of physical connections, they are extremely flexible.

Understanding and Configuring VLANs - Cisco

www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/switches/lan/catalyst4500/12-2/25ew/.../vl...

which is what you get if you Google on vLAN ..... and which does not add much to my understanding of why I might use it!

Hugh
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Re: Interesting - But I have a few questions

@Majas

Not sure what you are trying to accomplish with the vLANs, but there is some user based controls. See if this information from the FAQs helps.

Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.

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