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Tips for Migrating to Windows 10

Windows 10 will be available as a free upgrade for Windows 7, 8.1 customers starting July 29th. Following are some tips to help you prepare.

1. Reserve your copy of Windows 10, if you haven’t already.
Click the Windows 10 App icon in the system tray of your current device. If you don’t have the Windows 10 App icon, run a Windows update. This should correct the problem on most Windows 7 and 8.1 systems.

2. Check your system compatibility.
Windows should notify you of any compatibility problems with your system or software prior to upgrading. However, you can manually check hardware specs (which are quite liberal), by visiting Microsoft’s website.

3. Make sure your security software is updated and active.
Microsoft is only migrating security software, which is already Windows 10 compatible. For this reason, it is important to update your security software before performing the Windows 10 upgrade. To learn how to update your Norton software, click here.

4. Back up your data.
It is always a good idea to back up your data to either an external hard drive or to an online location. Norton 360 customers and Norton Security with Backup customers can run either a local backup or online back up to protect their data. Click here for details on how to do this.

5. Check for and download critical application and driver updates.
If you have software applications or hardware devices that you want to confirm will be able to run after the upgrade, check your manufacturer’s website for details and updates. Download Windows 10 compatible updates and drivers and store them on removable media such as a CD-ROM or USB key with instructions for performing the updates.

6. Write down any important support contact information beforehand.
Most of us have multiple ways to access the internet, but it can be handy to have the most critical support contact information on hand. Norton support can always be reached at support.norton.com.

7. Have someone else perform your upgrade for you!
If you’re uncomfortable upgrading your PC to Windows 10 and want someone to do it for you, Norton has a solution. The new Norton Ultimate Help Desk: Assist for Windows 10 service will allow you to enjoy the peace of mind of having an expert Norton tech manage your seamless transition to Microsoft Windows 10. It’s the fastest way to get your PC up and running on the latest technology without worrying about whether the apps you rely on will continue to work. With advanced remote access technology, Norton-certified technicians help you from anywhere with an Internet connection, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. A remote Norton-certified technician will upgrade a Windows 7 or 8 PC to Windows 10. For more information and pricing, click here:https://us.norton.com/ultimate-help-desk-ultimate

Comments

Kudos0

the link re WIN10 help desk assist does not appear to take me to $99.99 product

please help

Kudos0

When will Norton360 be available for use on Windows 10?

Kudos0

Windows 10 is widely alleged to be spyware by numerous tech experts. What is Norton’s opinion on this? Are they all mistaken? If so, why? If Norton doesn’t publicly address this issue, it doesn’t take security seriously enough.

Kudos0

These articles might help.

http://www.zdnet.com/article/no-microsoft-is-not-spying-on-you-with-wind...

http://www.forbes.com/sites/gordonkelly/2015/11/02/microsoft-confirms-un...

https://www.yahoo.com/tech/how-to-keep-windows-10-from-spying-on-you-125...

It appears that Microsoft is collecting user experience data and there is a way to turn the automatic upload off.  If you've ever used a products such as Eclipse, you would likely be turning this upload nonsense off with each upgrade.  I always turn this off for both security and performance purposes.  Corporate instances of Windows will always have this turned off because internal security departments would not allow it and all this uploading would kill their networks.  As far as diagnostic data, Windows does this now and it appears they intend to collect more.  Other operating systems that I have worked with collect a lot of data in crash dumps, some can be sensitive.  It all goes to what happened during the crash and shortly before the crash. Question is how secure is this data should something break into Windows 10?  The big question is, how seriously do you take security?  If you run everything as the admin and the admin account is broken, then you already have a security problem.  If the admin account is compromised, "You're cooked Jim!".