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Kudos0

Is there a way to set fixed IP address or DDNS name for a device?

I have several IP cameras on my network, and I need to able to add them to my DVR with with either a hostname or IP address that won't change.

I see the core has a DDNS like thing for internal nodes (e.g xyz.lan), but these cameras don't make a DHCP request with name. I used to be able to setup a DHCP lease with static IP for a given MAC. Will this feature or something like it be added?

Replies

Kudos0

Re: Is there a way to set fixed IP address or DDNS name for a device?

Are you saying that you cannot assign devices static IP addresses? I am receiving my Norton Core next week, but that would be a deal breaker... I searched the user manual and there was no mention of "static", although maybe it is addressed in a different way.
Kudos0

Re: Is there a way to set fixed IP address or DDNS name for a device?

I was told by Norton that you cannot assign devices static IPs or even set an IP range. So what do I do with the Core sitting on my computer table now?

Accepted Solution
Kudos1 Stats

Re: Is there a way to set fixed IP address or DDNS name for a device?

pd5rm Norton Core, at this first release, does not support assigning static IP addresses to connected devices. Another option to ensure that a certain connected device will always get the same IP address is to enable at least one Port Forwarding rule to it. That will lock the IP address for that specific device. 

Kudos0

Re: Is there a way to set fixed IP address or DDNS name for a device?

My Core arrived with an intermittent WAN port, so I have not been able to complete set-up, and see the features under the hood...

Can you just assign static IP address outside the DHCP range? For example, if the router is issuing DHCP address from 192.168.100.1 - 192.168.100.200, can you assign static IPs between 192.168.100.2 - 192.168.100.99? I have used this approach in the past with similar needs, but I don't know if it will work here without testing it myself...and I can't since mine doesn't work. But it might be worth a try.

If the above suggestion does not work, is this a feature that is expected to be added in the near term?

If not, I may just return the router, than ask for a replacement

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Is there a way to set fixed IP address or DDNS name for a device?

GordianKnot this feature is a request we have on our backlog.

In the meantime I suggest you try the following:

1. Norton Core WAN port might be connected to intermittent home Modem LAN port, please switch it to another port and see if this issue still persists.  

2. Replace the ethernet cable which you have connected to your Norton Core WAN port and see if that helps.

3. Call Norton support and they will be happy to help out asap. 

Kudos0

Re: Is there a way to set fixed IP address or DDNS name for a device?

I'm unable to see the DHCP range used by the router (it's not exposed via app settings), so can't use a fixed IP address in same subnet without possible future collisions.

So other than workaround suggested by Benz above (specifying a port forward to lock the IP), there's no way to do this. Unfortunately, I don't want external traffic to hit my internal IP camera. I suppose you could create a forwarding rule to non-existent port, but that just seems like a hacky workaround for brand new state-of-the-art wireless/router. ;-)

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Is there a way to set fixed IP address or DDNS name for a device?

You mean this $300 router that may or may not ever be shipped to those of us that pre-ordered it cannot do something as simple as assign a static IP address?  Nobody there thought that might be helpful?  My networked printers ALL have static addresses to make connecting to them easier.

Kudos0

Re: Is there a way to set fixed IP address or DDNS name for a device?

Who sets up a wireless (or even just networked) printer and then DOESN'T configure it with a reserved DHCP address?

I guess someone who's wireless printer is referenced by name or someone who hopes their router never reboots.

What is this router missing (many things). What does it add (besides decentish hardware)?

Kudos0

Re: Is there a way to set fixed IP address or DDNS name for a device?

I'm also in the Static IP address situation for 8 devices and have a useless Core about to be returned. How far on the backlog are we talking? If it's a week or so out, maybe I'll wait, otherwise it's time to make the return. 

Another item that better be in the backlog is that ability to change the base IP address of the Core. Re-configuring my network of static IP devices and a bunch of associated apps to accommodate swapping in a Core router with a fixed base address of 172.16.0.1 is ridiculous. These are vary basic router features that should have been available on day 1. 

Been a loyal Norton customer for over 20 years. Not sure it that will continue. 

Kudos0

Re: Is there a way to set fixed IP address or DDNS name for a device?

Mine went back today, I finally got an RMA yesterday for this reason.  I still don't believe that the router was ready for release without these simple functions that are available on a $50 router.  

Kudos0

Re: Is there a way to set fixed IP address or DDNS name for a device?

Unfortunately went through the RMA process today also. Wanted Core to work, but the lack of basic settings was a deal breaker. Wish I had known about the settings issues up front. It would be nice to have those hours back. 

Although the Norton Core support system worked, my impression was the call center was just learning the product. Information on the web covers only very basic issues. On the web you can find a few very basic setup screens which is about all it can do at this point :( 

Kudos0

Re: Is there a way to set fixed IP address or DDNS name for a device?

Another +1 from me. I made the RMA request today as well.

This issue and lack of details in the user interface for connected devices (e.g sites connected to, pretty bandwidth time graphs) were the deal breakers for me.

Other things that influenced my return decision were:  the managed vs not managed confusion, inability to dig into what counts as security issues and customize it, the nearly useless score metric, and not needing the Norton software products on desktops (so can't justify the rather high yearly subscription fees).

If I had a longer return window, I would've kept it to see if software upgrades fix these issues.