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Kudos0

Does NS Scan HTTPS Traffic ?

The subject of HTTPS  scanning has recently become a hot security issue.  Many argue that scanning HTTPS traffic decreases, rather than increases security.  I have read on a post on Wilders that says that NS does not scan HTTPS traffic.

The issue became hot when an article was published demonstrating how Kaspersky's implementation of HTTPS scanning made it's users vulnerable to The FREAK and other critical malicious attacks.

https://blog.hboeck.de/archives/869-How-Kaspersky-makes-you-vulnerable-t...

(I believe Kaspersky has issued an update to protect it's users from ONE of the several vulnerabilities scanning HTTPS traffic exposes the user to.)

Some security suites don't scan HTTPS traffic to protect the user's privacy, even without the vulnerability concern.

The Electronic Frontier's Position on the subject is very clear:

"Dear Software Vendors: Please Stop Trying to Intercept Your Customers’ Encrypted Traffic...

But the most important lesson is for software vendors, who should learn that attempting to intercept their customers’ encrypted HTTPS traffic will only put their customers’ security at risk. Certificate validation is a very complicated and tricky process which has taken decades of careful engineering work by browser developers.2 Taking certificate validation outside of the browser and attempting to design any piece of cryptographic software from scratch without painstaking security audits is a recipe for disaster..."

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2015/02/dear-software-vendors-please-stop-...

It certainly is a dilemma for security suite vendors - a trade-off of sorts. It is my understanding that approximately 33% of all web traffic is now https traffic.

Heads I win, Tails you lose

Replies

Kudos0

Re: Does NS Scan HTTPS Traffic ?

Kudos0

Re: Does NS Scan HTTPS Traffic ?

bjm_:

https://community.norton.com/en/comment/7193321#comment-7193321

Thanks bjm, but I don't get it. Doh:

you say: "Norton does not scan https traffic. Norton detects attacks using https connections."

Kudos0

Re: Does NS Scan HTTPS Traffic ?

Does Norton scan https traffic...?

I have read on a post on Wilders that says that NS does not scan HTTPS traffic.

The IPS (Intrusion Prevention System) included in Norton Security now detects attacks using https connections, and stops those attacks before they take up residence on the device. Permalink

 https://community.norton.com/en/blogs/product-update-announcements/norto...

Introduced in version 22.7.


By my read Norton does not intercept users encrypted traffic.   By my read secure traffic via https is not scanned, e.g., my online bank transaction is not scanned.   However,...IPS now detects attacks that use https connections.    Correct me.....Please.

Kudos0

Re: Does NS Scan HTTPS Traffic ?

bjm_:

Does Norton scan https traffic...?

I have read on a post on Wilders that says that NS does not scan HTTPS traffic.

The IPS (Intrusion Prevention System) included in Norton Security now detects attacks using https connections, and stops those attacks before they take up residence on the device. Permalink

 https://community.norton.com/en/blogs/product-update-announcements/norto...

Introduced in version 22.7.


By my read Norton does not intercept users encrypted traffic.   By my read secure traffic via https is not scanned, e.g., my online bank transaction is not scanned.   However,...IPS now detects attacks that use https connections.    Correct me.....Please.

Whatever :-) It's beyond me. But it's the protection that counts :-)

https scanning is controversial among some within the privacy and security community. Some privacy advocates like EFF claim it's a no-no, some in the security community now claim it's a must have as it can have vulnerabilites that make it a growing attack vector. It appears that Symantec's method might satisfy all factions.

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