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Kudos0

Fake Norton email

I got an email purportedly from Norton about something called KRACK that can compromise devices through wifi. Link in email goes right to a payment page with no description of a product or choice as to whether you want it. Just pay. Smells like a scam. FYI

Replies

Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

Is this email from Norton legitimate?

With a vulnerability as serious as the KRACK problem is bound to attract spammers trying to get you to part with your money.

Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

Hi @Laurie Spencer - Symantec DID send an email today concerning KRACK with a “Norton WiFi privacy” link at the bottom that inadvertently went to the buy.norton.com billing page. It is legitimate. 

Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

OK.... it is legit.  So, how difficult is this VPN to set up ? Do I need to alter any passwords ?  What is the added Protection ? and What is the cost ?   Thanks

Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

See information on Norton Wifi Privacy here.    https://us.norton.com/wifi-privacy?inid=hho_nortoncom_homepage_hero12_wi...

Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

Thanks.... tried that, but it was moew a sales pitch wanting me to accept a @phone call.  I only want a quick answer to my original questions.  I am starting to think that there is no immediate danger and the whole thing is a sales gimmick.  Thanks, anyway.

Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

I got into a text chat with a Norton Rep and mentioned that I only use a secure home router and never use public WIFI along with entering passwords, etc. and asked under those circumstances is this KRACK WIFI issue anything to be concerned about. But as parrskool stated, it's essentially a sales pitch regardless. They texted back to me that they wanted my phone number so they could sell their product regardless how applicable my circumstance was. I texted back that they essentially answered my question anyway and ended the chat.

Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

parrskool 

Thanks.... tried that, but it was moew a sales pitch wanting me to accept a @phone call.  I only want a quick answer to my original questions.  I am starting to think that there is no immediate danger and the whole thing is a sales gimmick.  Thanks, anyway.

Are you referring to my link or a link in the email you received? The link I gave does not ask for a phone number. It just gives the information on the Norton Wifi Privacy product, including the different subscription levels and prices.

Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

Terence1000

How did you initiate the Norton Chat? Was it from your Norton product or from the Norton.com web site? If you just did an internet search, you may not have been chatting with genuine Norton Support.

The only reason that a genuine Norton Support tech might ask for your phone number is for verification of your identity when checking your Norton Account.

Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

It was on us.norton.com below:

https://us.norton.com/wifi-privacy?inid=hho_nortoncom_homepage_hero12_wi...

"Talk to an agent" and "Chat now" appears to the side of the site.

Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

Terence

Thanks for clarifying. Many users come here thinking they were dealing with genuine Norton support when they were not.

Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
Kudos1 Stats

Re: Fake Norton email

@peterweb "The only reason that a genuine Norton Support tech might ask for your phone number is for verification of your identity when checking your Norton Account."

I believe they ask for your phone number in case they get disconnected, they can try to call you back. That happened to me last week. 

Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

Dave_Coleman:

@peterweb "The only reason that a genuine Norton Support tech might ask for your phone number is for verification of your identity when checking your Norton Account."

I believe they ask for your phone number in case they get disconnected, they can try to call you back. That happened to me last week. 

Yes. I forgot about that.

Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

Norton Security claims to protect my devices from viruses etc and that the purchaser is well protected. The in-software screens claim my devices are protected. It doesn't say protected, unless it's to do with wi-fi. It's not my job as end user to worry about where or how threats come. Why should I pay more for something I was led to believe I had already paid for? I shall take this further with applicable regulators and authorities

Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

Norton Security protects your device from infections coming into your device. The Norton Wifi Privacy will protect your wifi connection from being intercepted/scanned where the bad guys can steal any personal information you may be sending out from your computer. ie usenames/passwords. 

Different products for different problems.

Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

Yes, Granted..... and that's fine BUT twice during the Live Chat I was asked to transfer to a 'phone line as the details would be easier to discussmthat way rather than via Chat.  

Kudos0

Re: Fake Norton email

Yes, Granted..... and that's fine BUT twice during the Live Chat I was asked to transfer to a 'phone line as the details would be easier to discussmthat way rather than via Chat.  

 

     But did you look at the link I gave above to the Norton web page for NWP? That should give any information you need.

    I am starting to think that there is no immediate danger and the whole thing is a sales gimmick.

    Not necessarily so. This vulnerability affects just about every wifi enabled device in the world. So your home router will need to get a firmware update before you are protected from the KRACK vulnerability. Apparently an attacker would have to be within range of your wifi network to exploit your network, so the chances may be low. So you have to decide if you are willing to take the risks.

    Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
    Kudos0

    Re: Fake Norton email

    I followed the link to the KRACK-fix (oh my, you know what I mean) and the one thing that raised my concern was the message itself being grammatically challenged, which we have all seen along the way in other scam/spam: 

    "Don’t forget to download and install the latest protection to each of device to be protected by Norton."

    I still do not know if I need it but am glad to learn it truly is a Norton message.

    Thank you.

    Kudos0

    Re: Fake Norton email

    Dear all, I am now more confused than when I started. I am not convinced this is a genuine Norton product and/or sales call. Why can't someone from Norton just confirm YES or NO whether this is all genuine?

    Kudos0

    Re: Fake Norton email

    I agree with JQ3. The thing is we are asked to pay for more protection again!! It would appear that the cost for the "  Norton WiFi Privacy " if I buy it,  is going to double my annual subscription. Is this another way to get me to pay out more money I ask myself. Also, for existing Norton members, why can't  Norton upgrade up all for a small nominal fee, this would benefit  them I'm sure for the loyalty of members/customers and show that Norton is genuinely looking after their interests and not just looking for a large financial gain from this exercise.

    Kudos0

    Re: Fake Norton email

    John Quinn 3:

    I am now more confused than when I started. I am not convinced this is a genuine Norton product and/or sales call. Why can't someone from Norton just confirm YES or NO whether this is all genuine?

    Bold in the quote is mine.

    You could contact Customer Support to see if they can reassure you                                                       Chat with Norton Support

    Windows 7 HP SP1 32-bit | Chrome 65.0.3325.146 | NS 22.12.1.15
    Kudos2 Stats

    Re: Fake Norton email

    John Quinn 3

    Why can't someone from Norton just confirm YES or NO whether this is all genuine?

    Employee Dave_Coleman did confirm that this is a genuine Norton email in the third post in this thread.

    https://community.norton.com/en/comment/7676971#comment-7676971

    Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
    Kudos0

    Re: Fake Norton email

    It would be useful to hear from someone who HAS taken the plunge and bought the required extra security.  How easy ws it to install, etc and in their view, is it worth it ?  I believe that to be "hacked" the crooks have to be quite close (whatever that means).

    MGM

    Kudos0

    Re: Fake Norton email

    It would be useful to hear from someone who HAS taken the plunge and bought the required extra security.  How easy ws it to install, etc and in their view, is it worth it ?  I believe that to be "hacked" the crooks have to be quite close (whatever that means).

    If you look at the wifi connections that are available to your computer, that will give an idea of what that comment above means. Usually in an urban environment, you will see the wifi from some of your neighbors. So likewise, they would see your connection. If your neighbors were hackers, they would be able to access your network. Likewise, bad guys driving around your neighborhood could do the same thing.

    How likely is this to happen???   Not very. But are you willing to take the chance?  Only you can answer that.

    It is easy to install and the default settings are fine for most. You can choose a specific countries for your virtual location if you wish.

    Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
    Kudos0

    Re: Fake Norton email

    where is the page that I can goto to have myself removed from any emails from Symantec as I would never trust if any of them are real, it's like when your bank sends you a email to let you know they are closed on holidays, i can't trust if that's real or not and I am not going too. 

    In the future I would like Symantec to not do this.. thanks...

    Kudos1 Stats

    Re: Fake Norton email

    Fishsticks

    Log into your Norton Account at   https://account.norton.com and click on the Personal Information tab. Scroll down to Email Preferences and uncheck the option for emailing from Norton.

    Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
    Kudos0

    Re: Fake Norton email

    Thanks peterweb,

    But that was unchecked and yet I still got it...

    Kudos0

    Re: Fake Norton email

    I was just informed of this in another thread.

    Email me product updates, offers, and security newsletters
    We will continue to send you information relating to your orders, account updates, Automatic Renewal service and important security alerts regardless of this setting.

    You may be able to contact Norton Support and ask them to remove you from all emails.   www.norton.com/contactcs

    Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
    Kudos0

    Re: Fake Norton email

    peterweb:
    ...Email me product updates, offers, and security newsletters

    We will continue to send you information relating to your orders, account updates, Automatic Renewal service and important security alerts regardless of this setting.

    The option to Email me product updates, offers and security newsletters has been disabled in my Norton account for years, and I'm not sure how the e-mail I received yesterday titled "Did you know Norton also offers you these benefits?" (EmailID: CA_TRIG_ACT_LC_NS-BU_T-74_BENEFITS, viewable as a web page <here>) could be considered "information relating to your orders, account updates, Automatic Renewal service and important security alerts".

    Microsoft released a patch for the KRACK vulnerability for all supported operating systems (Win 7 and higher) on 10-Oct-2017 with the October 2017 Patch Tuesday updates (see Lawrence Abrams' bleepingcomputer article Microsoft Quietly Patched the Krack WPA2 Vulnerability Last Week) but that fact isn't mentioned in any of the Norton e-mails.  What bothers me most is that Norton continues to override the e-mail preferences in my Norton Account by calling these promotional advertisements "important security alerts" and using them to upsell products like Norton LifeLock, the Norton Core router, Norton WiFi Privacy, etc.
    ---------------
    32-bit Vista Home Premium SP2 * Firefox ESR v52.4.0 * NS Premium v22.11.0.41 * MB Premium v3.2.2

    Kudos0

    Re: Fake Norton email

    MS did patch Windows systems. So the wifi on the individual device cannot be hacked. But the networks that the device connects to can be hacked if the routers have not been patched. So If you connect to that router, someone may be able to intercept your data as it is sent through that wifi network.

    The option to Email me product updates, offers and security newsletters has been disabled in my Norton account for years, and I'm not sure how the e-mail I received yesterday titled "Did you know Norton also offers you these benefits?" (EmailID: CA_TRIG_ACT_LC_NS-BU_T-74_BENEFITS, viewable as a web page <here>) could be considered "information relating to your orders, account updates, Automatic Renewal service and important security alerts".

    The disclaimer on the option says 'We will continue to send you information....for important security alerts. Norton obviously considers this email a Security Alert, and as such they are able to send it to you. And of course they piggyback an ad for a Norton Product that can help protect you. 

    Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.

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