• All Community
    • All Community
    • Forums
    • Ideas
    • Blogs
Advanced

Not what you are looking for? Ask the experts!

This forum thread needs a solution.
Kudos0

Ghost 2001 error 25030

Hello,

I'm upgrading my PC from XP to Win7 and converted both partitions on the boot drive from FAT 32 to NTFS using the converter tool, convert.exe.  Everything seems operational, however when I attempt to image the drive I get the following error which is not listed in the user guide:  Abort 25030 NTFS GetClusterCount () failed.  Not sure what that means as this version of Ghost supports NTFS according to the manual.  I'm using a Ghost Boot Disk containing MSDOS.

Any ideas on how to fix this?  I don't want to proceed with the Win7 installation until I know I can back things up.

Thanks,

Glenn

File Attachment: 
Labels: Norton Ghost

Replies

Kudos0

Re: Ghost 2001 error 25030

Did you image the partition before converting it?

The error file says the volume is flagged as bad.

Try running chkdsk /r on the C drive.

Open a command prompt and type:  chkdsk /r

Answer yes to letting it run on reboot and then restart the system.  It may take a while to finish depending on the size of the C drive and how large the partition is.

Dave

Kudos0

Re: Ghost 2001 error 25030

Thanks for the prompt reply, Dave.  Your suggestion to run chkdsk makes perfect sense so I ran it, but unfortunately everything checks out ok on C:

I do have images of both partitions in FAT32.  I installed the drive last weekend in prep for the Win7 install as the old boot drive was too small.  The ghost images were restored after I partitioned the new drive using FDisk.  That's one thing I can say about Ghost is it's a pretty bullet proof backup strategy...this new HDD installation was as painless as it could possibly be.

But now, I can't image the converted NTFS partitions....

Glenn

Kudos0

Re: Ghost 2001 error 25030

Would you be able to start over and restore the FAT32 image onto a new sector aligned partition?

Windows XP and previous OS's all used cylinder aligned partitions that have a 63 sector offset (31.5KB).  Windows Visa, 7, 8, and 10 all create "sector aligned" partitions that have a 2048 sector offset at the start of the hard drive (1MB). The 1MB (1024KB) is a "round number" that allows all the clusters to end on 4K boundaries.  That's critical for SSD's for the clusters to be all correctly aligned on these boundaries.  What most people don't realize is that it's also pretty important for converting FAT32 to NTFS. 

When the FAT32 partition is sector aligned, convert.exe will convert everything to NTFS and use the standard 4KB cluster size.  When the FAT32 partition is cylinder aligned (as it is by default) then convert.exe makes everything end up with a 512byte sector size.

Windows 7 will work either way but 4KB sectors are much more efficient and is going to work a little better because of less overhead.  It also prepares you for later being able to change to a SSD.  Unaligned partitions on a SSD work much slower because if the clusters don't "fit" perfectly on the SSD sectors it takes twice as many read write operations for each cluster.

When I converted several of my FAT32 NTFS systems years ago, I first changed them from cylinder alignment to sector alignment before converting them to NTFS.  If I remember correctly I used Bootit NG, it has a function called "align for NTFS" that moves all the data over a little bit to create the sector alignment.  (The Guru Brian_K has posted many instructions here on how to create the Bootit bootable CD if you want to go that route).

An easier option may be to simply wipe the drive, create sector aligned partitions and restore your images into them.   Fdisk can't make the correct partitions as far as I know but several free tools can do it with no problems.  Bootit by Terribyte, gparted, partition wizard, or even a windows 7 installation CD can do it by booting to a command prompt and using diskpart.

It sounds like a lot of work but that is what I would do, restore the image onto a sector aligned partition, convert it to NTFS, and then I bet ghost won't have any problems.

You may be able to skip using convert.exe because most of the tools I mentioned above should be able to convert the partition after restoring it.

As the old saying goes, if your going to do it you might as well do it right.

Dave

Kudos0

Re: Ghost 2001 error 25030

I just thought of something that may change your plans.

Windows 7 does not support an "upgrade" from XP.  It's not an in-place upgrade that preserves your programs and data, it wipes the drive and installs windows 7 clean.

The only way to "upgrade" is to go from XP to Vista and then from Vista to Windows 7 and I'm pretty darn sure that Vista needs to be activated before it will allow the windows 7 upgrade.

Dave

Kudos0

Re: Ghost 2001 error 25030

Hi Dave, thanks again for your help.  I downloaded and ran the MiniTool Partition Wizard and 'aligned' the partitions, but alas, Ghost still can't read the drive.  Mind you, I did all this without restoring the FAT 32 partitions as you suggested....it is a shortcut but it should work, no?  For what it's worth, Xp is a little slower to load now, but not by much. 

MiniTool doesn't seem to print to a log so I took screen dumps of the partition info for C: and compressed them using 7zip, then changed the suffix to .zip to upload them.  As far as I know, only 7zip will open the screen dumps (it will on my machine).

Hope this is of some use to you.  I appreciate all the help you've given.

Glenn

File Attachment: 
Kudos0

Re: Ghost 2001 error 25030

Hi Dave, yes, I know that XP is not directly upgradeable to Win 7, that's one reason why I want to make sure I can back up what I have.  I'd rather do a clean install anyway, but incrementally...it'll save a lot of time in the long run....I hope.

This thread is closed from further comment. Please visit the forum to start a new thread.