• All Community
    • All Community
    • Forums
    • Ideas
    • Blogs
Advanced

Not what you are looking for? Ask the experts!

This forum thread needs a solution.
Kudos0

Registry cleanup in Norton 360

I can not find the registry cleanup function in Norton 360

Replies

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Product Manuals
https://support.norton.com/sp/en/us/home/current/solutions/v96047160_EndUserProfile_en_us?OpenDocument&src=manuals
see page 387 Norton 360 Product Manual

My two cents.  Don't use N360 registry cleanup.

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

I was just informed via chat that the team that designed the new 360 determined that, because registry cleanup was rarely used, it would be eliminated. This, in my view, was an ignorant decision. I'm confident that most people weren't even aware of its existence since one was required to go to settings to turn it on.

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Same opinion as oneinameg. Just spent the last 20 mins looking for registry cleanup in the new Norton 360; then found out through this forum it no longer exists because "it was rarely used". My car has an "ESP off" button that I rarely use, but it still has one and the next version of my car has one as well. Being "rarely used" does not make it an irrelevance.

The new layout of the graphs is also useless

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Dunandst:

Same opinion as oneinameg. Just spent the last 20 mins looking for registry cleanup in the new Norton 360; then found out through this forum it no longer exists because "it was rarely used". My car has an "ESP off" button that I rarely use, but it still has one and the next version of my car has one as well. Being "rarely used" does not make it an irrelevance.

The new layout of the graphs is also useless

I'd say this is more like taking your vehicle in for servicing, and upon picking it up at completion of "said servicing", discovering that it will no longer start.  Upon asking as to why, you're told (by a Plasticine-smiling representative) that your car was updated (during said "servicing") to the "new and improved" version 2 model - which no longer utilizes nor is encumbered by the presence of an ignition system (making it much lighter and far more economical to operate) - and furthermore that this "improvement" was done (for you) because it had been determined (by other Plasticine representatives) that the ignition systems (in your version 1 model) are rarely, if ever, used (since they normally remain parked throughout the average 24-hour day).

Your rebuttal to this is that your version 2 model vehicle is only 6-months into its 2-year 100% warranty and that you now can no longer use it since an integral part of it has been removed (and branded as being an improvement or enhancement)!

To which they respond by saying that - If you feel this "improvement" is not "right for your needs", that you are (of course) always welcome to buy a new different vehicle (from them) which (for now, at least) includes an ignition system...

All this, of course, (quite ironically) made perfectly legal by the EULA which you "automatically agreed to" the day you first started your version 1 model vehicle and drove it off the lot...

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

If you want to live dangerously and use a Registry Cleaner use a decent, free one -- CCleaner.

Unlike the Norton versions it tells you what it finds and makes you agree to dealing with the listed items; and it offers to make a backup of the registry as it was before you made the suggested change so that you can restore back to where you were. Norton's registry cleaner did not of these things.

That's why many of us kept telling users and Norton how dangerous it was to give a surgeon's scalpel to someone who was not medically trained! And they listened.

But I've seen so many people report they have bricked their computer by using a registry cleaner and now have a good door stop.

There are millions of lines of code in the registry and I often wonder if even Microsoft knows what is in there! Cutting out a line here or a line there is not going to improve anything. Deleting lines that point to non-existent functions ignores that they may be there for functions that are going to be added ..... and again are not going to speed up your computer.

If you have a problem that you KNOW is caused by an error in the registry and IF you know exactly what the error is and what it should be then by all means use the REGEDIT function that is already in Windows, back up (Export) the registry to safety, make the change using the functions in REGEDIT ...... and IF you can do all that then you are already a trained computer expert and don't need to be told all this!

So why not save yourself a lot of hassle, and possibly a lot of money, and leave things alone .....

Hugh
Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

I had the same complaint.  I know your views on the Registry Scanner huwyngr, but I have used it regularly for over 6 years.  I accepted I probably don't need it and was fine for the first 2 or 3 days but I now feel the need to use it!  A few glitches on the laptop and no tool to turn to!  I want to downgrade back to the old version of Norton 360 now and run the registry scan and just see if it fixes the glitches, as it always has done for the last 6 years.  I know theory says it doesn't, but I just want to see if it actually makes a difference now.  I posted on another thread requesting how do I roll back now, but if anyone can tell me I'd be very pleased.  I had Norton 360 and it's been updated to Norton Security with backup.

I felt just as strongly (above poster) and have calmed down - providing everything ran smoothly but my laptop is now quite glitchy.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Same advice then Hazel -- use something like the free CCleaner and then you are not only learning by seeing what it flags but are safeguarded by backup enabling you to reverse if necessary.

It's entirely up to you but surely it is better to be able to reverse a bad decision than (a) not to know about it until something unpleasant happens and (b) not be able to reverse it except by either reinstalling or detailed registry editing which most of us are not trained to do. I know I am not!

 but my laptop is now quite glitch.

Why not start a thread, here if you think it is directly related to the Norton product you have or had on the laptop, or in Tech Outpost if it's just plain glitchyness and tell us what you mean by glitch! Startup problems; online problems; specific applications .... Then maybe we can deal with the problem and find a solution!

There is an awful lot built into Windows itself especially from 7 onwards dedicated to finding problems and fixing them -- Microsoft have a whole website devoted to "Fix-Its" for problems and "Repair my system" is a built in function too ....

Hugh
Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

I did research and purchased Norton Utilities for PC Cleanup.  Amazing tool - can't believe the crap I had on my laptop.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Thanks!  Is the registry cleaner in Norton Utilities the same version as the one that is in Norton 360 do you know pjannotti?

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

No.

NU Registry Cleaner is more thorough and you can create a Restore Point before removing any entries.  You can also pick and choose what to, or not to remove, unlike the registry cleaner in N360.

A little bit of knowledge is... well a little bit of knowledge.
Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Ok thanks - silly me for assuming it would be the same registry cleaner.  That sounds better for someone who knows what they are doing.  I used to quite like that the Norton 360 one did it for me - haven't had a problem in 6 years.  But it seems I can no longer use that if it's not possible to roll back.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

I decided rather than try and roll back to the old version of Norton 360, which would only be  a temporary solution, I would download a trial version of Norton Utilities.  I agree it has done a good job of cleaning up and you can backup the registry, however it really needs an instruction manual that downloads with it rather than just presenting you with a big button saying 'Optimize Now' which I foolishly clicked without reading up on setting up settings.  The result is it has removed all of my System Restore points.  So I am not happy about that.  I have now gone into settings so I only clean up what I want and when I want, but after a bit of reading up it seems it is normal for NU to remove System restore points as a kind of 'security'??!! and to disable System Restore.  So I don't want that thank you.  Unless someone can tell me a way of keeping NU while it not affecting System Restore.  I had backed everything up before installing anyway, but I don't like having my Windows 7 options affected.

So in my book, NU is not a replacement for the registry scanner that has been removed from Norton 360 and it seems most Utilities programs will do more than I want, but I have remembered that my laptop (Sony Vaio) came with a built in registry cleaner and defragmenter, which didn't cause any issues previously - haven't needed it for some time due to using Norton 360, but our other two laptops aren't Sony and don't have this built in.

I know I know - people say don't use registry cleaners - but I just want the worry-free computing I've had for the last 6 years with 3 smooth-running laptops and not hours spent messing about.

I take the point about starting another thread on individual issues.  But by glitches I mean the small annoying erratic things rather than one major issue.   Norton 360 did a good job of cleaning up junk left by other installed programs.

So my laptop is a bit zippier since installing NU but I don't have any system restore points.

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Quite a few years ago I posted on the Norton Forums that in my opinion Norton should concentrate on malware detection and prevention when along with most other big anti-virus programs they started adding "features" with the aim to make their products more attractive. One difficulty with a Company like Norton which has been trusted by many people over many years any feature included is deemed safe and it leads to buttons being pressed often without thought or knowledge. We are almost all "guilty" of doing this until we do something which turns out to cause us problems.

I appreciate once somebody is used to having a tool which they like and use without problem it is annoying and difficult if then removed from the software. I have used a fairly moderate cleaner since my first home PC back in the 1990's without any problem. Indeed one of my laptops is 10 years old, the cleaner has been used since I purchased it without problem, so I am not against their use.

I still think Norton is best not to have such tools in their software and if we want to use similar software we can always look around to see what is available and seek advice. Perhaps they could then put more of their technical and research into the main use of the program and avoid the terrible problems have yet again faced with an Upgrade or Improvement. An optimiser within Norton is a complete waste of time in modern systems.

Hazel I can appreciate and completely understand your feelings on the matter, I am not sure it is worth paying anything for Norton Utilities even though it is a one of payment. Perhaps chat and ask advice and you may find a free solution to your problem that you will get used to as you did with Norton. Turning back to the earlier version of N360 is only going to be a temporary solution and I don't see Norton changing their mind any time soon it does not seem to be in their culture to listen too hard to their users these days. They hope you with many others will keep Norton 360/NSwB or choice of Norton software and purchase something else from them.

Michael   

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Thank you Michael.  Actually I am really fed up now.  I trusted the registry cleaner in Norton 360 and it served me well for 6 years.  I don't like Norton Utilities - it does much more than I need and no clear instructions on how to set it up.  I have now reset my laptop to factory settings and will be spending an hour or so removing all the preinstalled programs (after which I will need some kind of registry scanner probably - I always used the Norton 360 one after this stage) and two days doing Windows updates and then put all my files and programs back on.  I'm tempted to just sell the laptop, get an ipad and be done with Internet Security for Windows.

I hope they do put it back - it was a mass population purchase for ordinary users who aren't computer literate and needed something conservative to clean their junk files now and then.  Actually I still have the old version of 360 on my netbook which hasn't been used for a while - I turned off automatic update and still have the registry scanner and old version on it - just wish I could move that onto my laptop.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

hi Hazel

As already said I can quite understand how you feel which is of Nortons' making.

How did you install Norton 360 onto your devices? Do you still have a disc for the previous version?

Perhaps you could use the use a memory stick to take the file from your Netbook and install it from there to your other devices?

Michael

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Unfortunately I haven't used a disc for many years and just used download versions.  Would that work putting the file on a memory stick?  Sounds a bit complicated.  But thanks for the help.  When I was on online chat last week they mentioned downloading the legacy version but I can't remember where the link was, and they also told me I wouldn't get the same up to date security with the legacy version so I went for installing NU instead.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

hi Hazel

I don't use a memory stick often so I wouldn't want to try to explain it in a forum, perhaps somebody who knows that it is possible and can explain it to you can help.

In a different thread one of the Guru users provided a link in the thread below, it does actually download the file, you will need to scroll down a few posts and look for the link for 360 not the earlier link which would direct you towards NAV/NIS.

It appears to be a download of N360 21.6.x.xxx.

https://community.norton.com/en/forums/norton-360-version-2250124

Michael

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Hi Hazel,

To best accommodate a successful version rollback, I'd recommend first using the NRT:

www.norton.com/nrt

After the computer restarts, ignore the instruction screen for downloading a new copy of your 360 (because it will get you the new version again!)

To download the installer for the previous v21 360 product, please use:

www.norton.com/oldn360

Remember to go into Settings and disable the Download New Version option as soon as the v21 version is installed!

Cheers!
John

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

If my PC became slow or glitchy, I used Norton Registry Cleanup to fix the problem. However, when it was set to automatically handle this I rarely had to do it manually. There are several free cleaners but they do not work automatically and require me to babysit them while they scan. The first online chat I had with Norton Support the tech told me that it was gone and nothing could be done. My choices were to install the new version and not have Registry Cleanup; or to keep the old version and not have the latest virus protection because some updates would not work with the old version.

After receiving an email, I had an online chat with a Norton Support "Supervisor". She said that the virus definition updates would take care of this. I pointed out that Live Update has nothing to do with the registry. She then said that Microsoft does not recommend registry cleaning utilities as they might cause problems requiring reinstallation of the OS. I then asked if that is the case "Why did Norton have this feature in the old 360 and why do they still sell Norton Utilities?" I was willing to accept the use of Norton Utilities until my subscription ran out. She said the best they could do was to sell me NU for half price. Why should I pay for something I already paid for when I can get a PC Magazine higher rated product for that price? http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2371155,00.asp

I research every year for the best software available. For many years in a row, Norton 360 has been rated the best security suite. PC Magazine doesn't even list it and neither does Norton's website show it for sale anymore.

So my decision has been to upgrade for the best virus protection. Download a free registry cleaner that I trust (I create a manual restore point before I run it) or buy one soon. Then when my subscription to 360 runs out I will purchase a better rated Antivirus according to PCmag. http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2372364,00.asp Norton Security is not even listed.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Thank you thank you!  I'm having a pig of a reset to factory settings - long story - but now have a working web browser and the old version back and I will be using the registry scanner to help get rid of all the stuff left behind all the obsolete c***ware I just uninstalled.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Thank you thank you!  I'm having a pig of a reset to factory settings - long story - but now have a working web browser and the old version back and I will be using the registry scanner to help get rid of all the stuff left behind all the obsolete c***ware I just uninstalled.

I would have thought Norton, as a large company, would have been aware of the need for 'change management'.  To avoid this kind of upset and outrage by customers.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Hi Elizabeth, you should probably look at this article in PC Mag:

The Best Security Suites for 2015 | PCMag.com

Before you make that decision, what you read was about standalone antivirus programs and not about complete packages.

I am also not affiliated with Norton or Symantec or any of its' holdings. So to say I am speaking user to user.

Not having a registry cleaner is a gray area. Microsoft created the registry to get rid of all the ".ini" files and hold some other configuration data in a central place, but they did not set any rules on it. It is a database without all the required support tools, and as with all databases it now is in multiple files. They also did not stop using ".ini" and configuration files, so just saying they cause this issue themselves.

So it just gets load with trash by a lot of programs, including Microsofts own programs. I can give you a interesting example from a company in Japan, they pushed the EEG data from scans into the registry at the tune of hundreds of Mega Bytes per scan. It gave them better play back speed at the cost of killing the systems performance over all. They did it, since there are no rules to keep it out of there. No registry cleaner would be able to fix that, the best they could do is defrag it. The program did not even remove the data when it was uninstalled, it had to be done manually so a normal user would have no clue why the system was now slow all the time. So one would hope in windows 10 Microsoft would fix this issue, but I would bet against them doing that just from their track record.

There are free registry cleaners out there, and they do create backups in case something goes wrong. But as far as automatic you have to pay for option as far as I have seen. I have anyways used Norton and a freeware program that has other functions that Norton does not. I have never let either one run unattended, I like to see what they are going to do to my systems before they break them. Both programs have good track records. I am not happy with Norton no longer having the registry cleaning program, but I can live with that it was just a bonus. Norton's suite has protected my systems since DOS days. On my personal systems I have only had one security issue in all those years and they addressed it as fast if not faster than the other companys. I supported a large engineering group having hundreds of users that use multiple different antivirus suites. Norton did better than the other companys and had less issues in the big picture. I was also connected with other support people that feed me information about their systems, so collective I had input from about 10,000 users.

In summary all I am saying, look at the bigger picture before you decide. If the something else looks better, check its' track record first. Do not jump into the fire unless you are wearing a proven fireproof outfit, it only takes one bad seam to make your day bad real fast.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Hi Hazel, I would answer they do have change management or they would not still be in business. I am guessing that Microsoft moving the release of Windows 10 up, forced Norton to reduce the supported update model. Meaning reduce the testing time and remove possible problem programs to support windows 10. What I mean is if Microsoft has changed parts of the registry structure and ACLs (Access Control Lists ), cleaning it could be a problem. One direct issue Norton is dealing with are the upgrade vectors to windows 10, the new version needs to be in place on the older systems before the upgrade. Also Norton is working hard at blocking the new problems like "HELP_DECRYPT" version 3 and ones we do not even know about yet. I am more concerned about the threats, than a minor speed issue. Don't get me wrong, I like my computer running fast just like the next user. But loosing all my files as a trade off is a hard call because I did not stay updated with my protection (In this case moving to the new version). It is an old issue speed versus safety, it has always been a tradeoff. Keeping your disk defragmented has a better payoff than cleaning the registry and has less of a risk of crash the system.

Just some food for thought.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

I see your point, but Change Management involves a statement similar to the one you made above, to customers, about what is happening and why  - and also giving some customers the option not to upgrade yet (none of our laptops are eligible for upgrade to Windows 10 due to incompatible graphics drivers).  Introducing a new version which works with Windows 10 is fine, but they could have kept the older version for customers with existing licences who are not able to upgrade to Windows 10.  It feels like we are being forced to upgrade to Windows 10 (ie buy a new laptop if you can't upgrade) by finding that a product suitable for Windows 7 but not Windows 10, has been changed.  Microsoft kept XP going for a long time after Windows 7 was introduced, they didn't just overnight stop XP from performing the same functions it had always done with no prior warning.  In fact the warnings about XP coming to an end were done very well, years in advance.  Change management is important because people don't like change and need to adjust to the idea gradually.

I don't use the registry scanner in Norton 360 to speed up the computer - and it doesn't do that.  I use it after uninstalling programs and it cleans up leftover bits of those programs that haven't been uninstalled properly.  Having rolled back, I did this last night (due to having to restore to factory settings and reinstalling).  I had to remove about 25 pre-installed programs that were out of date, obsolete or just packages I didn't want.  I started out using revo uninstaller to remove them but was too scared to delete any registry entries it found as I haven't used revo uninstaller before (at the time I didn't know if I could roll back to Norton 360 with the registry scanner) so I used it to monitor registry entries of uninstalled software.  It found over 1,000 left after uninstalling an old Java program although I think that number would have reduced after I uninstalled the second Java update which had to be done through Windows uninstaller.  Once I had Norton 360 installed again and ran the registry scanner it removed 314 items.  I checked all of them afterwards and they were all related to Java and Sony uninstalls.  That gives me quite a bit of peace of mind that the installed registry scanner clearly focuses, conservatively, on uninstalled program leftovers.  Which cause 'glitches' I have found, and those glitches go after running the registry scanner and removing the leftover bits of program.  In fact I am wondering if the 360 registry scanner uses similar software to revo uninstaller.

I accept that the registry scanner may not be compatible with Windows 10 and that is probably why it has been removed.  But I am not running Windows 10.  Surely they could have had two versions - one for Windows 7 and one for Windows 8 and 10?  Windows 7 is being supported for another 6 years or so yet.

As two of our laptops have ssd's I never run disk defragmenter.  If I want to clean up/speed up I use the Windows disk cleanup utility.  The Norton 360 Registry Scanner is/was a very useful tool for dealing with programs that don't uninstall properly.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Hi Elizabeth.  I have to say that was my gut reaction too, but I wouldn't trust any of the other tune-up utilities.  They do too much and are too aggressive - hence the dilemma of the 360 registry scanner being removed.  I downloaded Norton Utilities instead at first, but I messed up my computer because I didn't understand all the settings, plus I think it does much more than you need and the registry cleaner is more aggressive, and hence riskier.  I have also tried the very popular CCleaner registry scanner and had to reinstall after using that too!  It's all very well saying you can back up the registry and put it back but you don't know which ones are ok to delete or not and can waste an awful lot of time and cause issues.  I don't think there is an equivalent registry cleaner to the one in Norton 360, and like you and many others, I trusted it based on years of experience using it.

Similarly with other antivirus programs - I have tried others in the last couple of years (free trials on laptops I was selling) and have ended up having to reinstall again.  I tried two of the touted top ones and found false positives which wrecked my system (Bitdefender and Kaspersky if I'm allowed to name names).  Any others don't have the same high percentage of 'safety'.  The only one I might have considered was Avira paid for version at about £30 which has an equivalent rating to Norton if you want to check that out.  It's annoying when you want to vote with your feet but the Internet Security side of Norton is probably the best and safest and it works.  Yes this has been an outrageously crass, uninformed change but the Internet Security product is worth staying with, much as it annoys me.  Also different reviews give different opinions and statistics on other Internet Security Suites - but they all class Norton at the top.

Sadly I don't think there is a replacement product for the Registry Scanner included in Norton 360, that is safe to use.  I think some people use the paid for version of revo uninstaller which monitors programs and their registry entries when they are installed and removed I think but still lets you choose what to remove - which sounds kind of slow and also needs knowledge I don't have.

I have rolled back to the old version with the registry scanner and set it not to update automatically to the new version, so as to sort my system, but I know this is a temporary measure and I will maybe use revo uninstaller in future, for uninstalling programs, although I have heard of mess ups with that too when deleting registry entries.  The Norton still has the tune up that removes temporary files etc, which helps stop things getting slowed up, and Windows disk cleanup helps clean and speed things up and can remove a lot of old redundant windows updates (it makes space rather than speeds things up really).  As long as you can clean up to prevent slowing down, it isn't really necessary to speed things up, so to speak.  But I do think there is now the issue of uninstalled programs leaving stuff behind that can cause glitche (ie slow things up, and freezes).

Windows experts say there is no need to remove old registry entries in Windows 7 due to the way it is designed - they just sit there and don't cause any problems.  Unlike with XP where it really made a difference.  I have to say the 360 registry scanner has removed a lot less since we have been using Windows 7.  On the other hand, that's the theory and I think many people like you and I have found improvements in running after using it to clean up.  Because who wants a computer that constantly has glitches.  Rather than change antivirus or find new clean up utilities, my first gut reaction was just to ditch Windows and get an Applemac - which I still think is a solution but out of my budget!
 

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

I am really angry about this, especially when I was told by Norton rep that I could get the registry clean by paying again for the Norton utility tool, I told him I am not paying more for a service that I have already paid for when I subscribed and I will not be re subscribing when this subscription runs out. They asked us to upgrade, but I feel I have been downgraded to a lesser service, so I am now not getting a service I have already paid for, its a rip off!. I cleaned my registry every week and will not help to make Norton richer by paying them even more for another tool to do it.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Microsoft can be very crafty, I have tried to download things from the site, then have come to a page where I have to pay money to use it, then after uninstalling what I downloaded so as not to have to pay for it I got pop ups which would not go away unless I paid the money, and I could not remove them or do anything else on my pc, I had to search in my files and delete the programmes then switch my pc off then on again to be able to use it. I will never download anything  from their website again. I have used Glary Utilities before which was very good, and it is free, and I will now re-install that to clean my registry, I will not pay Norton even more money to get a tool which they have taken away from me.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Hi, Sharon. You might want to have a look at this thread which discusses registry cleaners.

https://community.norton.com/en/forums/registry-cleaners-digital-snake-oil

Windows 10 Home X 64
Kudos1 Stats

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Hi Hazel, some things to think about. I am sorry this is so long, but I feel I should provide some background information.

I know a little bit more than the most users about the XP support being stopped. Microsoft was going to stop supporting XP much earlier than most people know. What stopped them were a few big companies and the US gov found out (two very large users of XP systems and Microsoft based systems in general). They were the players that forced Microsoft to go on record and set a new end of support date and put out notices. No end users could ever do that to Microsoft, look back at their history. Only big customers that have support contracts can do that. End users do not spend millions on support contracts. The realtime version of XP it still supported, and the updates are done in such a way that it will break the normal version of XP if you try to install them. Also some normal XP updates still are being put out, I still have 6 running XP systems. I do not leave them connected to the internet except for updates, since they are very high risk.

As far as change management goes the same is true, only the big corps and gov users have full support contracts. They are the ones that all other companys sent the notices to for change management. In some cases nice companys send it to all users, but very few do.

As far as Norton goes I would guess their focus is split between windows 10 and new threats. They may have over looked the registry tool in N360 for the older systems, but like I stated above the upgrade to windows 10 is a problem for them. They have to have working programs in place before the system is upgraded so that the upgrade will work with. What would you do, if you had to make that choice? Microsoft set this ball rolling, shorten the track, and limited the choices.

The other hidden piece in this puzzle, is big corp now leases their systems. So upgrade of hardware is not their issue (they just switch out what will not upgrade and it goes to a refurbishment company that then sell it us end users). For us end users hardware upgrades are a big issue, we have a limited budget and we cannot limit our costs in that way.

As far as SSD goes:

There are some SSD defragmenter programs out there, but I do not know if they are any good. I have not looked very hard into that. But I know the tech of how SDD's work and the possible issues with defrag'ing them. It will reduce the drives working life by a lot. The flash memory in SSD, SD etc... have a limited write life (the number of times a cell can be rewrittern before it will not take change any more). (I worked with flash devices in the 1980s before flash cards were created. And a simple error in code used the write life up in tenths of a second.) So in SSD drives there is a management program built into the controller that monitors write cycles to cell blocks (groups of cells). When the count gets near the limit, the controller moves the data to a new location in the flash memory that has a low useage count to prevent very active locations from becoming unusable. Some SD and CF devices also have this built-in. So in general SSD drives are a bad choice in a long term system, unless you plan to changing them out over time. Maybe as they get so large, you in your life time cannot possible use all of the available locations, then the answer will change. By the way, think about how all the programs that log systems activity, and all the temp internet cache files, error logs, and file rewrites that happen on a systems just being turned on and not used to do any work. The software should have been redesigned to put all of that highly active data on the something that does not wear out. That would also make the system much faster in the bigger picture, since all the static programs would be in fixed locations and not in fragments all over the place thank you Microsoft and the hardware/software designers in general. This is even true in all devices that use flash that includes Apple.

Now on to Apple:

As far as switching to the Apple products, tie your hands behind your back and use your nose to run them. What I mean is this, things you take for granted on a PC are sometimes impossible to do on a MAC. Things you do for free on a PC cost on a MAC in more then just money. Apple also stops supporting hardware and updates as do most companies, but in the case of a MAC in some cases you cannot even update third party software to deal with problems so the hardware becomes a running brick. Do not get me wrong, Apple has a large user base that thinks they are a god, and can do no wrong. Look under the hook and see what I am talking about. And they do get viruses and other bad things Apple just does not talk about it in general and never has. They have better control then PCs, since they force you to do all most everything through them for a price. They do have some free things, but that list is very short. So have a look. I did not look very deep, search for "apple viruses". They claim no, but look under the hood not at Apple support. The biggest issue is people believe that they do not need anti-virus on a MAC, what do you think after reading through some of the data? Remember Apple stops the support at some point, so older systems are even more at risk. If MACs become the system of choice, what do you think the virus writers and hackers will attack more? The only reason at this point is it is harder to attack and most hackers take the easy path first.

One last side note, Microsoft years ago was forced to provide free tools by the internet community. They got sued under the anti-monopoly rules for forcing their programs on you and not giving you a choice as well as actively blocking third party add-ons as well as mis-use of freeware programs. There are more details to this, but this is a general summary.

So in summary, big business makes choices no matter what they decide and some consumers get hurt. If they hurt too many they are out of business. It is this simple and has always been.

So as I use to say in my past corp life: "These are just my opinions, take them with a grain of salt they will task better."

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Thankyou Norton Fighter xx

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Phil42

They may have over looked the registry tool in N360 for the older systems,

No way it was overlooked!

I was here and doing support at the time and there were continual complaints from users and from us helpers about the problems caused by blind registry editing and in particular by the double whammy with the Norton version that did not show you what it was going to do and ask you to accept it combined with no route for recovery.

I do online support elsewhere and have been since the late '80's and Registry Cleanup is a regular source of "I cleaned my registry using XYZ and now the computer won't start" .... and they rarely have a recovery image (if they did they wouldn't think of using a registry cleaner!)!

It even did a number on my computer but that is a multibooted one and it fixed what it said was an error in the Registry for one Windows installation by pointing it's "missing" Registry entry to a different version of Windows on a different drive ..... And left me to sort it out using Regedit.

Norton may well have been influenced by having something in Norton Utilities but that is just as dangerous if used blindly as one user has recounted in this thread. And of course there are alternatives including free ones but they are just as dangerous if used blindly.

Microsoft and, others who can be trusted as not self-interested, keep telling users that the business of speeding up your computer by "cleaning up your registry"  is by and large just not true and while cleaning out temp files and the Recycle bin may help on "starving" machines both can be done by easy facilities in Windows itself -- Disk Clean in Drive Properties is there at a right mouse click as is empty the Recycle Bin.

As others have said let Security Software concentrate on protection.

"That's all I'm saying ...."

Hugh
Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Thanks for the explanation Phil.  I agree with everyone that Norton needed a product in place for Internet Security on Windows 10.  My point is that they could have more than one product.  Keep Norton 360 as it is (for Windows 7 users) and inroduce the 'new version' for Windows 10 users.  I think generally Windows 7 users are being consigned to the scrapheap - Microsoft Security Essentials also seems to have stopped providing good Internet Security for Windows 7 users and focusing on their newer technologies.

After my recent experiences I don't actually think of the Registry Scanner in Norton 360 as a "Registry Scanner" and agree that registry scanners/cleaners can do a lot of damage.  The one in Norton 360 rarely removes anything.  The majority of the time the results are 0.  Nothing cleaned.  It's only really after uninstalling something it picks up one or two things.  You can then check what those things are by clicking on 'more details' (or whatever it says) and if you really want them putting back you could do a system restore (I think there might even be an option to put them back but haven't tried to do so).

Anyway it seems to me it is more like Revo Uninstaller and only focuses on leftover bits of programs.  It can be turned off or set to only run manually.  It is a very useful tool.  I have always found it very safe and I trust it.  I wouldn't trust any other registry cleaner however, so that leaves me without the option of using this tool.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Just as an update with regard to the Registry Cleaner in Norton 360. I think one of the reasons it is so popular with users is, it doesn't seem to do anything risky and seems to know what is ok to remove.

After my re-install and with everything set up and obsolete programs removed, I ran the registry cleaner and it cleaned 344 items (the Sony Registry scan found over 1,000), all of which related to uninstalled obsolete Sony software or uninstalled out of date Java (which came with the initial setup).   Since then I have run it a few times.  Most times it comes up with 0 problems.  The only time it has come up with anything is after installing or uninstalling a program.

So twice it has removed two items.  The first time it removed

1) ProgID, “Equation.2,” refers to an invalid ActiveX/COM entry, “{00021700-0000-0000-C000-000000000046}.”

2) The key, “CLSID\{C523F39F-9C83-11D3-9094-00104BD0D535},” refers to an invalid application identifier, “{8A523F4F-AB44-4477-BAB0-151E5936D144}.”

Which I think was after installing Adobe Reader and possibly installing or uninstalling something else (I can't remember now).

The second time it removed

1) The file extension “.wlpginstall3,” refers to an invalid program identifier “WLPG Detection.”

2) The file extension “.wlpginstall,” refers to an invalid program identifier “WLPG Detection”

I think this was after installing Windows Live Movie Maker and Windows Live Photo Gallery (which come packaged together) as I wanted to have Windows Live Movie Maker for video editing as it does more than the current one under Windows Essentials.  The removed entries seem to be related to this.

I accept the theory that Windows 7 is built so it doesn't matter if there are obsolete registry entries, although I did feel a cleanup was needed after uninstalling a load of pre-installed programs.  I also think the N360 Registry Scan works on a very safe level - much safer than any other registry cleaner and it is nice to have.  I would buy it if it was available for purchase separately, but the one in Norton Utilities is not the same.

I do hope they decide to put back the Norton 360 with the registry cleaner, as a separate version to the new 'Norton Security' (which seems to be a revamped NIS), for the many Windows 7 users for whom the current Norton 360 tune-up tools are still compatible.

I accept that some people have had their systems messed up by some registry cleaners, but I doubt very much if it was the one installed in Norton 360 - maybe a different registry cleaner (or even a different kind of mess-up).

Non-techie customers have been using Norton 360 with its built in registry cleaner for years and years and years, in their masses - if it was really such a risky tool it would have been removed a long time ago. I think it is purely that it is not compatible with Windows 10.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Hazel

I accept that some people have had their systems messed up by some registry cleaners, but I doubt very much if it was the one installed in Norton 360 - maybe a different registry cleaner (or even a different kind of mess-up).

It certainly has been with the Norton 360 registry cleaner and reported by other users here in these forums; reported by me personally as indicated in my message to Phil42; reported in non-Norton Forums that I do support in, both specifically for N360 and as you correctly indicate for others as well. It can happen with any Registry Cleaner that either works blindly or where the user does not have a background to judge whether or not to take a decision -- which very few people do.

 I think it is purely that it is not compatible with Windows 10.

The decision to drop N360 (NIS & NAV) altogether and not just the Registry Cleaner was taken while 7 was still the mainstream and 8 was just coming into use. What you have now with current versions of those three has more in common with Norton Security so that Norton does not have to keep 4 different systems in step with changing attacks and changing operating systems.

Commonality -- or convergence as Microsoft calls it for Windows 10 -- is the name of the game and Norton is putting its efforts into Norton Security and NS with Backup where there is one single family of "engines" and not the sub-variations for NAV/NIS and N360 which continue in name and protection updates.

Do believe me that I understand how much anyone dislikes losing some feature they are used to -- it's happened to all of us both with Norton products and with others including Windows itself -- but when a "feature" generates complaints from users that are soundly based and when this is combined with the knowledge, based on experience in programming involving the registry and on structured before and after tests, that the feature rarely produces actual benefits then it makes sense to drop it.

Hugh
Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Norton 360 Support Team:

Please consider a product update that RESTORES the "Registry Cleanup" function in N-360.

There are times when that's the only tool to restore the computer and get things back to normal.

While the function is not used routinely, there are times when you need it to restore normal operations of one's computer.  It's like a spare tire, or a set of jumper cables.  You don't need to use them everyday, but when you need them, nothing else will do the job.   I am currently facing such a problem right now on another computer.  I currently need the registry cleaner to get my other computer working again without reinstalling Windows.

Thanks for your consideration.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Hi Ken - I ended up trying Norton Utilities, messing up, reinstalling Windows and have now rolled back to the old version of Norton 360 with the registry cleaner and turned off automatic update of new version in the settings of Norton 360.  Thanks to some people on here who gave links and instructions on how to do this.  It was very easy and worked smoothly.  Also can I suggest you put your post above on the 'Product Suggestions' thread - I did this.  Hopefully they will see how many people are asking the same thing.  And I agree - that is my experience too.  I don't know why all our experiences of useage aren't being listened to.  It's a tool that has worked for me for years and saved me a lot of hassle.  I've heard all the theories of it causing problems, but that is not my experience and I have been happily using it for over 6 years.  I still think if there were real probles with that registry cleaner in Norton 360 it would have been removed years ago.

The time to think about removing it is a year before Windows 7 stops being supported, when Windows 10 (and possibly later incarnations) are the only options left and are designed differently to not need the registry cleaner.  I have accepted people saying Windows 7 doesn't need it, but I have also found it helps after uninstalling programs, especially ones that don't uninstall properly.  I also accept though, that it has become a habit and a bit of a crutch for people like me who needed it with XP and have continued in the same habits with Windows 7.  I certainly use it less in Windows 7 but have still found it a useful tool.

If registry scanners/cleaners are that bad, why are they still making Norton Utilities?  The one in Norton 360 seems much more conservative and safer to me.  There is also the option to system restore if you find it has caused a problem by removing something, but in over 6 years I have never found it has caused a problem and if anything, resolved issues that have caused problems.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Ken

In case you haven't noticed, I'm one of the sceptics about Registry Cleaners <g>

There are times when that's the only tool to restore the computer and get things back to normal.  [ ... ]  nothing else will do the job.   I am currently facing such a problem right now on another computer.  I currently need the registry cleaner to get my other computer working again without reinstalling Windows.

It would be very helpful to everyone if you could give chapter and verse on this -- exactly what was wrong with the computer, the symptoms, what the Registry Cleaner actually found and how it put it right.

The only examples of making changes to the registry that have actually cured a problem I have seen documented have been when the technician working on it had identified the problem down to the specific registry entry at fault and who used REGEDIT in Windows, or ran a prewritten .reg file, to change that entry to what it was known it should be. 

Also the System Restore mentioned by Hazel has no relationship to the Backup/Restore action taken eg by CCleaner to backup the part of the registry being changed to a .reg file which when run changes the registry itself back to what it was. System Restore changes actual files to earlier versions and can in fact cause problems to Norton and other security programs since they use and keep track of system file parameters to watch for changes that should not take place and so after a System Restore their data is out of step with the changed Windows system. This crops up here in the forums from time to time.

So if you can document exactly what the problem you refer to is and exactly what the registry cleaner does to fix it that will be valuable to know .... and of course which Registry Cleaner you use.

Hugh
Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

And another brick in the wall.

Apparently they are reducing their product capabilities to save money.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Robert

And another brick in the wall.

which perhaps makes it appropriate to add "Brain Damage"  ? <g>

Not anyone here of course .....

Hugh
Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Of course.

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

I have been using  Norton 360  for  10  years  or so.  I  run  Registry  cleanup  when  required  say  every  6- 12 months mainly  if  I  install a  program   and  then  remove .I  say  Bring  back the  Registry  cleanup -  I  demand  or  say  please.

As  part  of  my  original  install   it  was  there .  I can argue  that   plugging a  new  key  in  for  12 months  extends  the  original  contract ,  after all the  Name  is  still  NORTON 360.

If  they  say  there are  a  small  number  of  users  then  give  the  same  number of  users  a   copy  FREE.

I had  Norton  Security  on a  Laptop  and  Purchased   Norton  Utilities  as  it  was  not  included.  It  was  in  Norton  360  but  the  Laptop  came   with  Norton  Utities.

I see  i have a  couple  of  Choices.

1.  Reload  original  disks  norton 360.  I  now  have  6  Pcs  to  maintain   all  up

2. Just  Load  Utilites  on  each  device    and  run  when  required.

It would  Seem  Norton  is   giving  Less  Value   if  you  are   a  computer  orientated  person.

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

John,

I can argue  that   plugging a  new  key  in  for  12 months  extends  the  original  contract ,

If we start getting legalistic the terms of your contract are in the EULA and that says that Norton can change what they want when they want to or words to that effect.

What you have is a contract to use whatever is called Norton 360 under those terms ..... as they may be amended from time to time is probably tucked in there somewhere -- they use lawyers, remember!

Seriously, there's a lot of discussions going on about what happens to a program over time but in this case they removed a lousy Registry Cleaner -- lousy because it didn't tell you exactly what it proposed to do and ask you if you wanted to do what it decided and then having done what you did not know gave you no tool to reverse any or all of the steps if it caused a problem.

Believe me, that Registry Cleaner could cause problems since it did not understand what you had installed on your computer -- in my case at that time 2 different versions of Windows, XP and 7 -- and it detected what it thought was a missing link to a file and then repaired the link in the Registry by pointing it to a file from the wrong version of Windows on a different disk to the one that was active .....

I was lucky and was able to find what it had changed in the Registry and undo it but I've had users come for help -- I do support elsewhere too -- because their computer was now a doorstop.

If you know enough to use a Registry Cleaner that tells you what it wants to do before it does it and makes you agree then get the free CCleaner direct from Piriform at https://www.piriform.com/ccleaner/download and when you use it make sure you set it to ask and to make a backup before changing anything.

But my advice is leave Windows alone -- it's too complex to mess with ...... even for Microsoft!

Hugh
Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Hey  Thanks  for  the  reply.  It  looks  like   we  buy  the  name  not  the  product.

I do not  use   multi  boot   System  ,  yes  I can the  problem.    More  than  on  System  use a  separate   plug in   SATA   Disc.  Solves  a  Lot  of  problems.

John

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

John

You don't even buy the name -- that is registered separately to Norton/Symantec <g>

You buy the right to use under specified conditions .... you may own the hardware but not the software. Just the way life works, not just with Norton, not just with computers .....

I know a number of people who use eg Thermaltake for plug in plug out disks but they weren't really available to home users when I started and multibooting does what I want -- and has some advantages.

Hugh
Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

I would reload the original disks and immediately turn off 'allow automatic updates' or whatever it says - under settings, then do all the live updates.  I wouldn't use Norton Utilities instead - I tried that and wrecked my installation and had to reinstall from scratch.  Because Norton Utilities had too many options, there was no instruction manual and I just clicked the big 'Now' button instead of going into settings first and setting up what I wanted to do - but even if I had done that, I still didn't understand what I was doing - the program is a bit dense on information!  And why would I want that hassle when the registry scanner in Norton 360 is so conservative and easy?!  I have rolled back for now and still have the Norton 360 registry scanner - not sure for how long, but at least it gives me time to plan an alternative, as opposed to being robbed overnight.

Whatever the legal technical position, at the end of the day people are paying for something as advertised and even if legally they can remove part of what they advertised as being included, it is bad practice and alienates customers.  I wonder what Trading Standards would make of it.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Hazel

 even if legally they can remove part of what they advertised as being included, it is bad practice and alienates customers. 

I was dealing with the earlier references to the legality of it . Most of us would agree not so much that it is bad to remove something that is defective or dangerous even if thought useful and safe when introduced -- remember that the platform, the version of Windows within which it operates changes, often without warning and so what might be safe under XP and even under Windows 7 might become less so after SP1 is applied to Windows 7 -- as to do so without announcement and some explanation.

On this latter point I can assure you that Norton Staff are well aware of this feeling among users and I doubt that it will be ignored.

Hugh
Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Thanks Huw - nice to know we are being listened to!  I think it must be incompatible or unsafe to use with Windows 10 then because we have all 3 been using it with Windows 7 SP1 for quite a long time now.

Kudos0

Re: Registry cleanup in Norton 360

Hazel7000:

Thanks Huw - nice to know we are being listened to!  I think it must be incompatible or unsafe to use with Windows 10 then because we have all 3 been using it with Windows 7 SP1 for quite a long time now.

The latest versions of all the Nortons, old and new, are supposed to be compatible with Windows 10 as publicly released by Microsoft (not necessarily the preview versions some people have) 

But your "we" doesn't include me with Norton 360 and Windows before even Windows 8 since, as I think I've said, I've had its Registry Cleaner damage my system.

Hugh

This thread is closed from further comment. Please visit the forum to start a new thread.