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Kudos10 Stats

Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Hello everyone!

I am extremely pleased to announce the replacement of the Add-On Pack (AOP) parental controls feature with Norton Online Family (NOF) for all NIS and N360 users. 

Q: What is AOP?

A: AOP was our old parental control feature.  It performed web filtering based on topics (sex, violence, etc) that parents didn’t want their kids to see.  If you didn’t use AOP before, don’t worry, no changes apply to you.

Q: Who’s impacted?

A: Anyone who had AOP installed, which worked with versions of NIS 2007 – 2010 and N360 v1 – 4.

Q: What’s the impact?

A: The Add-On Pack support will end in May 2011.   AOP will not be available to NIS 2011 users.  Existing AOP users will stop receiving URL block list updates from LiveUpdate in May 2011.   If you have AOP installed, it will still be on your system filtering what it always did, but new updates to the block list will cease on May 2011.

Q: What do I do if I want parental controls with NIS 2011?

A: If you need parental controls, we urge you to use Norton Online Family, which has won rave reviews, and is vastly superior to the functionality that was provided with AOP.

I am truly pleased to provide our users with full NOF feature support.  We have not in the past offered NOF in place of Add-On Pack because we didn’t have the full complement of languages until now.  Now that NOF has all the same languages offered as NIS, NIS & N360 users can take advantage of the market-leading features NOF provides, things like:

Web Monitoring & Blocking tracks what web sites your kids visit

An easy-to-read activity report shows you at a glance ALL the web sites your kids visit, or attempt to visit. You can visit the sites your kids have been to and block specific sites or types of sites.

Time Limits  makes managing your kids’ computer time a breeze

You can set limits on your kids’ computer time to help ensure they aren’t spending too much time online and to teach them good computer time management habits. You can even limit computer use to the specific hours or days of the week.

Social Network Monitoring keeps an eye on your kids’ social network activity

You can see what social networking sites your kids belong to and how your kids represent themselves online (name, age, profile picture). You’ll gain insight into what your kids are doing so you can provide guidance and help them make smarter choices

Chat Monitoring* monitors your kid’s instant messages and chats

Monitors many major chat services and tells you who your kids chat with and what they say, so you can make sure the people your kids chat with - and what they chat about - are appropriate. You’ll also know if your kids are being cyber-bullied or if they’re cyber-bullying others via chat.

Search Monitoring tells you what your kids search for

Tracks the words, terms, and phrases your kids search for online. You’ll learn more about your kids’ online interests and you’ll know if they’re intentionally seeking out blocked or inappropriate content.

Custom Alerts notify you when kids do something they shouldn’t like visit blocked sites

Lets you keep an eye on your kids even when you’re not at home. Norton™ Online Family automatically sends you email alerts about specific online activities such as when your kid ignores a warning or visits a blocked Web site.

Enjoy!

--LanaK

* Not available in all regions or for Mac OS

Replies

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Hello everyone!

I am extremely pleased to announce the replacement of the Add-On Pack (AOP) parental controls feature with Norton Online Family (NOF) for all NIS and N360 users. 

Q: What is AOP?

A: AOP was our old parental control feature.  It performed web filtering based on topics (sex, violence, etc) that parents didn’t want their kids to see.  If you didn’t use AOP before, don’t worry, no changes apply to you.

Q: Who’s impacted?

A: Anyone who had AOP installed, which worked with versions of NIS 2007 – 2010 and N360 v1 – 4.

Q: What’s the impact?

A: The Add-On Pack support will end in May 2011.   AOP will not be available to NIS 2011 users.  Existing AOP users will stop receiving URL block list updates from LiveUpdate in May 2011.   If you have AOP installed, it will still be on your system filtering what it always did, but new updates to the block list will cease on May 2011.

Q: What do I do if I want parental controls with NIS 2011?

A: If you need parental controls, we urge you to use Norton Online Family, which has won rave reviews, and is vastly superior to the functionality that was provided with AOP.

I am truly pleased to provide our users with full NOF feature support.  We have not in the past offered NOF in place of Add-On Pack because we didn’t have the full complement of languages until now.  Now that NOF has all the same languages offered as NIS, NIS & N360 users can take advantage of the market-leading features NOF provides, things like:

Web Monitoring & Blocking tracks what web sites your kids visit

An easy-to-read activity report shows you at a glance ALL the web sites your kids visit, or attempt to visit. You can visit the sites your kids have been to and block specific sites or types of sites.

Time Limits  makes managing your kids’ computer time a breeze

You can set limits on your kids’ computer time to help ensure they aren’t spending too much time online and to teach them good computer time management habits. You can even limit computer use to the specific hours or days of the week.

Social Network Monitoring keeps an eye on your kids’ social network activity

You can see what social networking sites your kids belong to and how your kids represent themselves online (name, age, profile picture). You’ll gain insight into what your kids are doing so you can provide guidance and help them make smarter choices

Chat Monitoring* monitors your kid’s instant messages and chats

Monitors many major chat services and tells you who your kids chat with and what they say, so you can make sure the people your kids chat with - and what they chat about - are appropriate. You’ll also know if your kids are being cyber-bullied or if they’re cyber-bullying others via chat.

Search Monitoring tells you what your kids search for

Tracks the words, terms, and phrases your kids search for online. You’ll learn more about your kids’ online interests and you’ll know if they’re intentionally seeking out blocked or inappropriate content.

Custom Alerts notify you when kids do something they shouldn’t like visit blocked sites

Lets you keep an eye on your kids even when you’re not at home. Norton™ Online Family automatically sends you email alerts about specific online activities such as when your kid ignores a warning or visits a blocked Web site.

Enjoy!

--LanaK

* Not available in all regions or for Mac OS

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

LanaK - Thank you for the information about the Norton OnLine Family program.  I have been using the old Add-on Packs, not for Parental Controls and Monitoring but for the Confidential Information Blocking feature that was offered.  I looked at what was offered in Norton OnLine Family and I didn't see anything about Information Blocking.  Does NOF offer Information Blocking and I just missed it or is that feature offered somewhere else?  Thanks again for the information. 

Kudos2 Stats

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

PC_confused: I'm the product manager for Norton Online Family and wanted to reply to your post about Norton Online Family. Norton Online Family does protect confidential information from being sent over email, chat conversation or posted on a web page.

Here are instructions on how:

About protecting personal information

Specifying personal information of the child

Turning on or turning off personal information protection
Setting up notifications when your child sends personal information

Hope this helps. Let me know if you've got other questions.

Thanks

Yvonne

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Yvonne - Thank you for taking the time to reply.  I must have overlooked that section.   I'll look into it somemore and maybe give it a try.

  I was going to mark your reply as the solution, but I can't see how to do that anymore.  Boy I'm sure missing a lot lately!!

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

PC-C

Only the original poster of a question can flag the thread as solved and your question came partly through the thread so I guess the system only allows LanaK to use that tool and she didn't ask any questions <g>

So we'll have to take your intention as the deed! <s>

Hugh
Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Well, I have never , to my knowledge, had any problem with the add on pack parental controls. It seems to be doing the job I wanted it to do. Now I have to change to NOF to get parental controls. And I see that Norton has it's own Norton online family users discussion forum, with posts about problem after problem with NOF on their computers.

Thanks Kevin

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Any screenshots of the software? Plus, does is the online family free?

Norton Internet Security 2011 , Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit (Check if you are eligable for a FREE Norton upgrade)Success is 10 percent inspiration and 90 percent perspiration.”--Thomas Alva EdisonI'm not a Symantec employee and my posts do not represent the views of Symantec.
Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

check out the link above in my original post first, and also the forum, here:

http://community.norton.com/t5/Norton-Online-Family/bd-p/OnlineFamily

Kudos2 Stats

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Hi TooStrong,

By just about all accounts Norton Online Family is among the best parental control programs currently available, and is far superior to the old add-on pack program.  This review points out the advantages of NOF:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2346364,00.asp

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

I'm not suggesting AOP had problems, I am merely saying that NOF is better in that is has many more features than AOP ever did.

Personally, I've always been a fan of moving on.  When cell phones got smaller and more feature rich, I upgraded.  Even though my Motorola worked just great, I now have a Blackberry because it does much more.  Maybe next year, I'll even switch to an iPhone if I can get my work email on it. 

Yes, there's a step here where you will need to download and get NOF.  it cannot be avoided.  but getting a better feature in the end may be worth it, and you may even decide you like it better than AOP in the end.

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

I've heard a rumor that online family would be charged starting from next year. Is that true?

Norton Internet Security 2011 , Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit (Check if you are eligable for a FREE Norton upgrade)Success is 10 percent inspiration and 90 percent perspiration.”--Thomas Alva EdisonI'm not a Symantec employee and my posts do not represent the views of Symantec.
Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

This thread really isn't about NOF.  For NOF specific questions, you are better off (and more likely to get responses) in the NOF forum. Since I'm the NIS PM, I lurk here, and the NOF PM lurks over there.

http://community.norton.com/t5/Norton-Online-Family/bd-p/OnlineFamily

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Mr. Lanak,

I'm been using Norton since I've had my own PC.  I've held Norton security as #1 and highly recommended it to everyone I know. I agree with PC_Confused on about the AOP. There're several parental control apps that does adequate service as for as monitoring and documenting usage. But, the NOF falls short in one area- unlike the AOP. I've followed your/the instructions for inputting confidential information. The NOF only monitors, but it doesn't block any of the confidential information.  I mean, what's the point of "monitoring" information, but not having the ability to instantly block it from being accessed? That's like having an alarm system for your house without doors/windows. Yeah a loud alarm'll go off hence notifying both, you and the police; but by the time you see your home again, it's too late. That's when  you find out that the most important items(confidential information) are gone. Now you have this huge possibility of identity theft. And only at that moment, you realize you should've had doors/windows installed and locked. (Now I know that's not the best analogy, but the premise is the same.) Alarms do not deter theft as much as barriers that block access to/from your valuables. Back to the analogy, what's the point of having a primo alarm system, if you can't stop your stuff from walking off?

It's sad that you plan to discontinue the AOP. With the introduction of the confidential information blocker...which does both notify you AND block info, NIS became aces because of how personal info is leached. Now it seems that you're resting on your lorals and becoming a little bit lethargic. The NIS '11, to me, is eye candy with a tad more bells and whistles. Security trumps optimization any day, in all-in-one internet security apps. In addition, you don't have to be logged in to setup the parental controls/accounts. It can be done without internet access. While with NOF you have to be signed/logged in. So I'm asking PC_Confused, as well as all the bloggers here, to join me in petitioning for and demanding retention of the AOP, especially considering how long we've been with and promoted the company. We deserve more...not less. I'll continue to use NIS- but it'll be the 2010 version. If NIS '11 isn't addressed with a similar, if not more robust, AOP w/confidential information BLOCKER...not "notifier", I'll continue to use '10 and consider finding another vender that offers a confidential information blocker and notifier while offering an able-bodied security a-i-o app.

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

The only reason I moved to Norton was that ZoneAlarm 7/8 had was terribly bug ridden and NIS2009 offered similar levels privacy protection together with much improved detection/prevention and a welcome reduction in PC performance hit (I had dropped Norton 2005/6 for ZA6.5 because of the performance hit). I was pleasantly surprised with the Add-On Pack Privacy Protection function.

I use the Privacy Protection to block access to not just for my information but also that of adult family members for whom I purchase goods from online shops. Even though I only buy from reputable shops, e.g. Amazon.co.uk, Sainsbury's, Marks & Spencers etc. but I need the reassurance of the ability to add other people's details for protection without having to create 'child to protect' profile. That feature is all well and good for Children/Families, but for those of us who simply want to buy something online for delivery to someone else at another address, e.g for my parents, for example, who are virtually computer illiterate, AOP was perfect and this NOF seems fatally flawed.

For example, if, as recently, I was to purchase a present for an adult member of my family and was using NIS2011 with NOF I would need to enter my debit card details logged into NOF as myself. But once I had done that I would need to submit my adult family member's details, therefore, according to NOF would need to be logged in as them. So would have to logout of my protection profile in again as the family member’s. But then the page will change and I would be presented with confirmation of my payment details requiring me to log out and log back in as me again (so I would be at risk during the 30 seconds of that process). Then the page would change yet again to the combination of payment details (my details) and the delivery details (the family member details). So in final step this I would have the choice of risking my debit card details and name or my family member address details and name.

That is utterly ridiculous - this seems to indicate that NIS2009/10 was all about repairing a severely damaged image due to poor performance - deservedly successful and congratulations are well deserved. However, now that is achieved the tarted-up  NIS2011+NOF seems to be more about appealing to parental paranoia and image than substance and from what I can see, NOF will be a very poor substitute as regards privacy protection apart from perhaps Child protection, which I have no use for and so have not investigated. It just seems that this is a cynical marketing ploy to attract all the Mums to buy it as it will protect their little darling and sod the adult users who do not want their paltry bank accounts raided or their retired adult family members details being passed on to cold calling agencies or worse!

Symantec you really need to ensure that you do not disenfranchise your newly won computer literate clientele in the rush to obtain the contents of 'Mummy's Purse'. => reinstate PROPER privacy protection otherwise I and many others will exodus.

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

AOP is a parental control feature - for parents to manage their kids.

That you used it to manage your parent's machines was an unintended bonus for you, but that was never a planned feature.

Kudos3 Stats

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

LanaK - Would it be possible to ask for consideration to perhaps split the two parts of the old Add-On-Packs into separate programs?  I have no need for monitoring a childs activities, so I don't really need the NOF program.  I did like the Add-On-Pack feature that would monitor any personal information I supplied and alert me when a website was asking for any of that information or I was sending any of that information either on purpose or by accident.  Then it was my option to either block the information being sent or allow it to be sent.  I don't think a program that was setup just to monitor my confidential information would need any updates from Norton's, just improvements to the original program.  I just hate to see what I thought was a useful program, being done away with. 

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Sure that can be considered, and I think it's a more constructive dialogue.

What I am really hearing is not that users are mad that AOP is going away b/c they love parental controls web filtering capabilities, but really they are worried about the CIB component, which blocked your sensitive data from being entered and sent in forms, web pages and IM messages.

I'd like to be really clear on the request though so I understand what people actually want.

Users are worried about sensitive data being shared without their consent into web pages without their knowing?

Users are worried their sensitive data is being stolen without their knowledge from their PC?

Users are worried about data leaks?

the feature would depend on the end goal we are attempting to achieve, so being clear helps ensure the need is being properly met.

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Moved to Norton Ideas for better exposure.
Tony Weiss | Norton Forums Global Community Manager | Symantec Corporation
Kudos1 Stats

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

The answer to your question Lanak, would be a sound "YES."  PC_Confused had a good idea of making it as a separate app. installation. (How ever being that CIB/Privacy Control is so vital to web usage, it only makes since to integrate those features available if not an included options in NIS going foward- to say the least.)  Reading BigRon's posting, my jaw dropped. Doing what he did while trying to maintain and restrict CI leaks turned into an overwhelmingly tedious task.  Something that would've taken seconds to do with CIB/Privacy Control, took what seemed to be maybe 30 or so minutes- including the log off/on times.  Users of NIS/Norton products do so because we get the best of both worlds: optimization and security.  So, again, to your following statements...

"Users are worried about sensitive data being shared without their consent into web pages without their knowing?"

"Users are worried their sensitive data is being stolen without their knowledge from their PC?"

"Users are worried about data leaks?"...

"YES.", to at least all the above.

And in light of BigRon's "ordeal", I suggest that the parental control stay the same.  The AOP yields convenient privacy controls and parental controls. NIS, as well of other Norton products , affords optimization+security=convenience with the peace of mind.   

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Thanks Marcus for the support, But I think maybe people misunderstood some of my posting, although the resulting remarks seem to indicate that in general the sentiment was communicated. What I meant was that I have remained with NIS2010 for purely privacy protection (parental control is not even active on my PC).

My concern is that a user profile on the NOF can only contain one users details to protect and that is decided when the user logs into the PC and then NOF. But that once logged in only the single name of that logged in user and their associated telephone numbers and singular address.

Whereas with the Privacy Protection component of AOP I can add as many names, telephone numbers, addresses etc I wish to protect from online eavesdropping. Also that protection is not limited to cover only one PC login; it applies to any user logged into that PC. So If I have parents visiting they can use my PC and be protected via the details that I manage on my PC whilst using my PC. Note: I never said I managed any other PC (LanaK, sorry for any misconception I imparted).

So, what has put me off NIS2011+NOF is concern regarding the lack of flexibility of having details of as many names (not necessarily the users), telephone numbers (not necessarily the users), addresses (not necessarily  the users), postcodes (not necessarily the users) etc, protected on one PC with one user logged in  (i.e. as I can using AOP)

To summarise;

1) Permit as many names, addresses, postcodes, telephone numbers, bank account numbers, credit/debit card numbers etc... to the list to be protected as I want and for that to be generic to a PC not a user, (just like AOP)

2) Prevent the above information from being given to any websites other than that I expressly want to have the information (just like AOP)

3) To prompt me when a website/page is attempting to access information that is listed in 1) if it is not in my list of permitted websites and to ask my permission BEFORE the information is given to the website and to offer the options of;

a) Blocking it (default)

b) Allowing it just this once

c) Allowing until further notice

I.e. just like AOP

4) For the granularity of this protection to cover the websites/pages I visit, email and instant messaging AND to be per instance of; telephone number, name, etc in the private information list (i.e. just like AOP)

5) There is an improvement you can add; when first using option 3) c) above AOP keeps asking until the next time you access the site. Please give the option to have this done immediately, a tick box would be good, and that way the user has a second chance to confirm that they really do want them to have access to that specific piece of information from now on.

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?


BigRon wrote: [...]  but I need the reassurance of the ability to add other people's details for protection without having to create 'child to protect' profile. That feature is all well and good for Children/Families, but for those of us who simply want to buy something online for delivery to someone else at another address, e.g for my parents, for example, who are virtually computer illiterate, AOP was perfect and this NOF seems fatally flawed.

For example, if, as recently, I was to purchase a present for an adult member of my family and was using NIS2011 with NOF I would need to enter my debit card details logged into NOF as myself. But once I had done that I would need to submit my adult family member's details, therefore, according to NOF would need to be logged in as them. So would have to logout of my protection profile in again as the family member’s. But then the page will change and I would be presented with confirmation of my payment details requiring me to log out and log back in as me again (so I would be at risk during the 30 seconds of that process). Then the page would change yet again to the combination of payment details (my details) and the delivery details (the family member details). So in final step this I would have the choice of risking my debit card details and name or my family member address details and name [...]


FWIW...I think, I can do the same thing (if I followed your scenario) via the Identity Safe.  I have a card with my identity & cards for the identity of others.  I have cards for each of my CC's.  So, would I not be able to use my identity card & my CC card to faciltate the online purchase and then also use the identity card of another for the send to name / address.  All cards are password protected secondary to the ID Safe master password.  

$.02

Kudos1 Stats

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Hi bjm

Yes this kind of protection is covered by the IDSafe feature set.

That's why it's important for me to really get at what people are really asking for, so we can try to message them if there is existing in product coverage, or if there is an actual, new feature that would be better than what CIB did.

the toolbar also protects against keyloggers from stealing any passwords or anything you type into a page as well, so the toolbar itself provides layered protection for the user who is worried about data being stolen.

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

bjm:   What BigRon is referring to is totally different from the IS.  The IS simply stores private info to do "auto fills" where the info is chosen  to be used.  It basically fills out forms and what-not so as to save time in visiting given sites.  It's more or less strictly a convenience feature rather than a security feature. If you're logged-in to your IS and depending on your settings, the IS will either automaticly auot fill or allow you to choose to auto fill forms that requires the saved info.  It doesn't "block" your info.  Where as the AOP w/Privacy Control does.  Private info is stored in cookies similar to the metadata in files.  Some sites will automatically extract the info without your knowledge.  Not all sites that do this are rogue.  AOP w/Privacy Blocker provides a level of security to protect what you deem to be private info.  So when you "drive by" or surf sites, you get alerted to the extraction and the type of info in "danger" of being accessed through these cookies.  Though they both provide a level of security, IS prevent prying eyes that may physically access your PC while AOP w/Privacy Blocker prevents prying eyes via the www.  You have more eyes on you via the www. web at one time than those you'd have physically watching you.  Hope this helps

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

LanaK: Key loggers are a threat.  And IS does address that.  But, as I explained to bjm, that's only one of many common methods of theft.  In Norton's efforts to provide true a-i-o security apps, it makes since to progress...not digress.  The IS and CIB provides both provide levels of security.  Though level of security provided individually is different, combined they provide more encompassing cover.  Key logging is a prominent threat, but not as common as extraction of your info.  With key logging one has to do more than just go visit a site; information has to be manually inputted.  Where as with info extraction, the only thing you have to do is show up i.e.. visit or  "drive by".  "Driving by" a particular site, takes only a split second.  And it  takes less than that for extraction.  To make it simple I'll put it to you like this...  Norton products and services' goal is to provide users with a universal "fist" against security- more so primarily on the www.  If you removed a "finger" that's serving a valid purpose, then it weakens the fist.  And a chain is only strong as it's weakest link.  If you remove a link or replace it with a weaker link, the integrity of the chain is compromised.

But LanaK, maybe BigRon and myself aren't using the correct verbiage to get the point across.  Maybe you're more of a visual technician.  So maybe you should get on two different PCs side-by-side to see what exactly we're referring to.  Hope this helps.

Kudos2 Stats

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Hi Marcus,

Cookie-info stealing via drive-by can't actually happen, since a cookie can only be accessed by servers on the domain that set it.  So any site that can see the information in a cookie would already have been given access to that information in the past, anyway. 

I am having trouble following some of the comments here concerning CIB.  Maybe LanaK can correct me if I am wrong, but my understanding of Norton's Private Information protection is that it only prevents you from inadvertently sending the specified information to an unsecured site or including it accidentally in an email.  It guards against user mistakes, not eavesdroppers or burglars.  It does not hide data from prying eyes.  It only comes into play when a user enters the data into a form.

There is one situation that often arises which may give a misleading impression that Norton is blocking something from being spirited away without user action.  Any time a character string that is identical to your predetermined private data is included in a transmission Norton will block it.  This causes alerts when some random number in a URL's parameter matches say, the digits of your Social Security Number.  In reality, it's only a coincidence, but it looks like your SSN is heading out to some website.  The web site has no idea that the number in question also happens to be your SSN.  The problem is that Norton just knows to always block that exact character string.  It does not know to differentiate something like a message ID number on this forum from your SSN.

Kudos3 Stats

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Marcus:  Yup drive by downloads are a threat, but AOPs CIB isn't our answer that particular threat.  For driveby downloads, we rely mostly on our browser protection, as well as IPS.  Those 2 technologies best protect you against these types of threats.

SendofJive is totally correct.

CIB's intent is to protect users from sharing info they may not want to share if they had better judgement, specifically, users who are kids.  Use case: prevent a child from sharing their phone number so they don't meet up with a creep from online who is some kind of predator. CIB relies on the fact that while a site may grab your info, you still need to interact with and push enter or click the submit button with the mouse.  CIB doesn't block until that user interaction happens.  It's possible some site could throw a 1x1 window that has a form that also hosts malware and searches your drive for your personal info which you stored in clear text on your system, and populated their form, but then the user would have to click a hidden button or get click jacked, etc for CIB to jump in and do something.  that's just how the feature works.  If this was a really big user problem, we would absolutely not rely on CIB to block it.  We would revamp BP, IPS or some combination of SONAR and these 2 along with bolstering reputation information on the threat.

BP's intent is to protect you against things exactly like drive-by threats which you are not aware of downloading on your system without your interaction or consent, establishing a beachhead/foothold with whatever bypasses your security, and then dropping down additional threats to silently steal your information.

Don't forget you have many different technologies wthin the product that are protecting you against all kinds of threat vectors. Thinking that CIB is critical to fighting off the biggest of the baddies is, in my opinion, incorrect.

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

LanaK - A long time ago, I was a kid so I guess CIB would still protect me from my own actions.  I agree with your statement that just relying on CIB is a bad idea.  That is why I use NIS 2011, to protect me from internet threats.  I did use the CIB feature to protect me from sending information out to the internet, that I really didn't mean to or wasn't thinking about when I clicked on the button.  The impression I get from reading a lot of these posts, is I'm the biggest security threat to my system.  NIS works very well in the background but does not protect me from my own actions.  If I understand from reading these posts, NOF only monitors private information and let me know what I sent out to the world.  Does CIB work like the Windows CardSpace program?  Maybe I can set up the CardSpace program, to work like CIB.

   I've also noticed that this post is showing up in three or four places.  If you make changes or reply to any of the posts, does it change in all of the others? 

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

ah, to return to childhood :)  but honestly, it sounds kind of scary to me, b/c I could swear my childhood was way less complicated than being a kid today.

I'm not totally up on cardspace, but I can tell you that our CIB was based on a relatively dated technology that was kept in place only long enough that NOF could get up to speed and replace it.  We have not had any feature development changes in 4 years. As such, cardspace seems to offer much more than what our little CIB feature provided.  

Cardspace is focused on identity protection, while CIB just blocked little pieces of data formatted a certain way.  It's a more direct comparable to our whole identity Safe / Toolbar feature.  Both encrypt their data, both try to prevent the user from re-inputting logins, passwords, form fill information, etc.  So it's not really for me, an easy answer since I think you get alot of what this is accomplishing with NIS as a result of the toolbar and you get it across IE and FF.

I would also agree NIS works really well, but we can't stop you from doing something to undercut us, like proceeding to install an app that download insight said was bad, or stop you from removing a file from quarantine and allowing a file on your system even if we found it to be bad.  That's something no IS/AV/total protection product can really defeat.  We sort of count on user cooperation in many ways 

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Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Ok, this is to SendOfJive, LanaK, and PC_Confused:

Some of us users don't have the technical intellect that you guys have, but we know what we want and we know what works.  I ascertained the string concept after couple sites.  And noticed the I get that pop-up more often than not.  Being that I'm not a power user but a little bit  more knowledgeable than the average user, every little bit helps.  And I was understand the impression that NIS is for average as well as power users.  And "we" allow others use our PCs (through altered Guest accounts of course); so that helps when someone isn't as knowledgeable as ourselves.  In spite of the "string" explanation, it still provides a level of security and comfort by giving us the knowledge info "leaks" and let us decide.  Like here in the news lately about a couple guys in Asia? created apps the siphon info.  We do understand that sites generally can't distinguish between one or the other, but again it let's us decide.  Notifications of any kind relating to CI is warranted....for us novices.

Of course user interaction is a huge part, those of us who aren't as knowledgeable would consider consider pop-ups as potential warning.  We read eachone and decide the appropriate action and the potential effects of them.  CIB isn't critical, in your eyes, but serves a purpose for "us".

Yes, NIS is only as good as it's users.  Yes, NIS can be undercut through lack of or the use of overwhelming knowledge.  No, it's not perfect.  But, for those who are not power users, average users, nor even novices, we need all the help we can get.  The analogy of a child  was made earlier.  As children, our hands are held till we get enough knowledge to learn and/or learn better.  So I guess I'm playing "advocate" for those people....the "we".

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Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Hi Marcus,

I understand what you are saying.  I think the misunderstanding arises because some of the protection that you are concerned about actually exists in other parts of the program rather than CIB.  The data stealing malware that you mention is actually prevented from getting into your system by the firewall and antivirus portions of the program, and CIB has no involvement in protecting stored data.  CIB's only job is to warn you when you are about to submit a form online that contains sensitive data.  Having done a bonehead thing myself  the other evening when I inattentively submitted a resume on a site that was not encrypted, I have to agree that we could all benefit on occasion from CIB.  So I am not saying that there is no value in the feature, only that the scope of its protection is actually much narrower than was being suggested.  And again, that broad scope of protection still exists but it is, and always has been, provided by components other than CIB.  I hope that makes things clearer.

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

SendOfJive,

First of all I'd like to say "Thank you" to yourself as well as everyone else who've been involved in this discussion, even from the beginning.  I've learned so much from you guys.  Even though your knowledge far surpasses my own, you're showing great patience and while remaining level-headed. (Which is a not common between techs and novices.) This type of open dialogue, helps people like myself learn through simple discussions.  Through this, I'm learning how to better articulate what it is I'm trying to get across.  For instance, I never meant to say that CIB had a broader scope of use than what it actually does.  I was not trying to imply that it blocks stored data- or at least not on purpose. (And thank you for bringing that to my attention, SOJ.  But, aren't cookies considered as "stored data" as well?)  However , I still feel it serves a purpose- to "us" that is.  I guess it could be considered as "training wheels" for us while you guys are on Harleys.  At least CIB should be kept as an optional feature or optional app add-on- considering that it's low/no maintenance for Norton.  Again, thank you.

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Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

LanaK - Would the CIB program work as a standalone program or does it require a parent program, like NIS, to operate?  Since the AOP will not work with NIS/NAV 2011, I guess CIB would need a parent program.  If there only seems to be the three or four of us that would like to keep the CIB program, it wouldn't be worth the effort on Norton's part to change the program.  I was hoping the CIB program would become available like the old Norton Utilities or Norton PC Checkup programs. 

  I'd like to thank everyone for their help in the discussion. 

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Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

thanks all for participating in the discussion.  As SendofJive noted, many of things that Marcus thought he was getting from AOP is actually provided in other parts of NIS/other technologies.

That's why I want to know what the ask is, and really drill into that so I can talk to the brainy people over here and see how/what we can do/already do to defend against it.

Also, to be clear there is considerable maintenance for AOP.  We had to release a new AOP with each version of the product.  AOP 4.7 needed to be released when NIS 2010 put out a 17.7 patch because NIS 17.7 doesn't work with AOP 4.5 (the previous version).  In other words, newer releases of NIS required newer releases of AOP.   It didn't magically work.  Add to that each year of the product (2008, 2009, etc) and you get a lot of AOP work and maintenance, even if the product feature didn't evolve in the last few years. It's a lot to ask for an already small and dwindling user base, especially when we have NOF waiting in the wings.  this is the big obstacle in continuing support for even the single CIB feature.  Right now, AOP needs a parent program, and I don' t have any way to get that changed.

In addition, you get URL block lists that are updated for the web pages concerned parents want filtered for their kids.  these are released in weekly Liveupdate patches, taking resource time and energy for patch creation and testing. 

Ultimately, I think we should take this thread to NOF and I'll have the PM for NOF look at it, to see what can be offered for feature creation to address the need expressed in this thread.   Even though this discussion has been lively, I see the greater need being addressed presently through other NIS technologies already.  If the CIB notify feature of NOF isn't what users want, then NOF should account for that.  If the experience is lacking according to bigron, then it should be revamped.  

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Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

At least one area of protection covered by CIB can also be provided by the Firefox browser.  Firefox can be set to popup a warning whenever information is about to be sent without encryption.  So any data entered into a form, not just user-specified private data, will prompt an alert if an attempt is made to submit it  to an insecure web page.

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Once again SendOfJive, you caused my thinking cap to light-up.   And LanaK the CIB topic has dwindled.  Now the parental controls...is it really that tedious like BigRon's example?  If so how is that's more improved compared to what's in the AOP? Again, if that's more improved, then the older PCs would be more convenient to configure, user-friendly, and seemingly universal.  What if a user is trying to do something and their PC info is in another user account sign-in?  They'd have to log-off/sign-in.  So if that example is true, the convenience goes out-the-window.  Would that be considered digression?  And thank you LanaK for being patient with us novice, average users.  All is well and done with CIB I think.  And I'm also glad you gave use an idea as to what it takes to make and add-on compatible with future versions.  Thank you all for schooling me on this topic matter.

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Hello again all,

I've been testing the CIB for the past couple of days.  Instead of putting in 5-6 digits like what's suggested in the instructions, I used all the numbers(as in SS#, phone#s, CC#, BA#, and routing number).  When all the numbers are entered, I absolutely 0 flags.  How ever the email address is a different story.  Does the NOF offer the options: Allow once, Allow always, and to block permanently?  That dynamic would be warranted in instances of unsubscribing from unwanted mail so as not to even get the in your spam folder.  In order to unsubscribe one would have to at least "allow once" their e-mail address to unsubscribe.  Other than that and the convenience of the PCs in AOP, I'm near fully convinced as to the reason for ending CIB services.

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

I've only just spotted this.

In previous versions of NIS I entered a small section of my Credit and Debit card numbers and occasionally I was warned that this sequence of numbers was just about to be transmitted and do I want to allow or deny the transmission.

Do I now assume that this protection is now gone ?

Lets be careful out there !
Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Kremmen,

You seem to have some of the same concerns I used to have. Through this convo, I learned about the "string" concept. For example: The CIB instructions deems it only necessary to enter the last 5-6 digits of the number(Social Security number, Credit Card number, etc.) you're trying to flag/protect. If you're wanting to protect 123456789 and you only enter 56789/456789, any "string" that just so happens to comes up with numbers in those particular sequences would be flagged. (i.e. Social Security number, Credit Card number, Phone number, etc., etc.) So hypothetically if the string consist of 918356789/372456789, then it's going to be flagged. I've tested this theory and found it to be true. You could also test it by entering the enter string of  number(s) you're trying to protect.    Hope this helps.

Now the only thing's left is to resolve the issue with NOF's PCs and to incorporate the AOP's flagging use of the email address.

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Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Dang, I'm now confused.

 Some says that the privacy control is just to keep someone at the keyboard from typing personal info and not to block any site from trying to take the info while your online. If this is the case in the past why did Norton warn me that some site was trying to get my personal info???

I like many don't need the parental control but want the privacy control as its one of the reason why I'm using NIS.

I would like to know if I can still have the privacy control and disable the parental control in NIS2011 like I could in 2010?    and will it work the same with 2011 as 2010???

Like I said Norton privacy control has alerted me of sites that was constantly kept on trying to get info from my computer and I never went back to those sites.

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Hi nmac,

You are under the same misconception about Private Information protection that was discussed earlier.  Online communications involve a lot of numbers.  If I tell Norton to always alert when my credit card number, 1234, is about to be sent, Norton will dutifully block any transmission of that number, not just the ones involving my credit card.  If I send an email to my friend John1234@xxx.net, Norton blocks it.  If the number 1234 is sent as part of an IP address or URL, Norton blocks it.  In this latter case, it might appear that the website is trying to steal your credit card number, because you didn't enter it and yet you got an alert.  The alert actually had nothing to do with your credit card.  Oh, the number 1234 was about to be sent alright - but in this case is was actually part of the parameter in a website's URL.  All of these false positives make it appear that something sneaky from out of nowhere has found your credit card number (which probably wouldn't even be on your computer, if you hadn't entered it into Norton's Privacy data) and is attempting to steal it.  In fact, it's just a number that coincidentally matches the number you told Norton to always block.  The only time Norton Confidential Information Blocking blocks your actual credit card number is when you enter it into an online form and attempt to send it out yourself.

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

@sendofjive... Thank you for clarifying.

But as you have said  many alerts were Norton false positives.  Many times I knew they were but Norton caught them without me typing anything. Does that tell you anything?  ( to me Norton is caching any and all of your personal info going out be it false positives or not.)

For a example if I had some malware that was sending personal info out onto the web, would not Norton act on these  just like it did with the false positives?

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Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Hi nmac,

Data theft is largely done through intercepting the sensitive data as it is being processed and transmitted.  This could involve keyloggers that record what you type, or devices that access the data stream and capture the information as it is being sent.  So the real danger happens at the time you are actually handling the data on an online form, not when it is just sitting in a file somewhere in a corner of your hard drive.  Malware is not going to ransack your computer trying to figure out what small string of numbers, contained somewhere in all those thousands of files, might belong to your credit card.  And obviously, any software attempting that would immediately find itself quarantined by Norton's Auto-Protect.  I think the threat you mention, of somehing malicious finding and sending one of your private numbers out as a single, recognizable entitiy is just not something that is going to happen.

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?




nmac wrote:

I would like to know if I can still have the privacy control and disable the parental control in NIS2011 like I could in 2010?    and will it work the same with 2011 as 2010???


Parental Control is NOT even installed until you choose to do so.  During testing the controls were found to be powerful and worked well especially if you have young kids on your computer.

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Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

I tend to agree with the false positives post.

Even if it flags up that a saved string is being sent out I could always 'allow or 'block'.

As said above, if a piece of Malware does get hold of a CC number the old Add On Pack, if set up correctly, would flag it.

Lets be careful out there !
Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Sup peeps,

Like SendOfJive has said earlier, the data/#s being flagged are sometime are coincidentally part of a string of #s. Meaning if you put in part of a CC# or BA#, in AOP CIB, then it'll emit a flag. It's just a coencidence that the the flaged #s are apart of CIB data. This can be confirmed by using the entire SS#, CC#, or BA#. You will then, like get 0 flags.....or "false positives".

Now LanaK,

I've been testing the NIS 11 for a few days now and found more issues:

1) With NOF, unlike with the AOP CIB, you can't set allowances for specific URLs or tools. With the AOP CIB, I had more customization because i could allow sites or apps to use my e-mail address, for example, while deniying others. I've been gettings warnings. With the CIB, I was able to block teh messeger's(MSN Messnager) access while allowing my e-mail client(Windows, Live Hotmail) access.

With CIB,, Iwouldn't get this because when I contiously choose to block something it's done automatically with out warnings.

2) Then the NOF, itself, renders a false positive. Everytime I sign into my client, I get this:

I check the Safety MInder online, in my system tray, and NIS but it's alaways enabled in all three. What gives?

I've not seen any benift of the NOF over the AOP's CIB, nor the PC. So to end the AOP doesn't make any sense from our(the users') stand pointThere're many parental control apps on the market- and most are free anyway. But I have yet to find anything like the CIB. Baring the string concept, it ddoes what it should do and is intricately customizable instaed of generallyWith CIB, we're allowing to allow/block three different types:messenger, e-mail, and I forget the 3rd. With these 3 catagories, and coupled with the ability to input allowences for specfic URLs while at the same blocking others, makes the CIB more robust than the NOF. Also, THE AOP is neater that NOF beceause there's now way to remove the Safety Reminder from the sysstem tray. And the SR always gives a notification that it's now working after I log on to my computer. That's a notification we can do without. And why isn't NOF simply and totally incorporated into NIS, instead of having to be online?

So Mr. LanaK, and agian, from our stand point it makes no since to end the CIB. Even with tha AOP, the PCs(Parental Controls) are better because you don''t have to be signed into a specific log-in in order for it to work for you. Further more, you don't have to have internet access to set up the PCs. The NOF compared to the AOP lacks the thing one thing that allows for Norton to maintain it's place in this market and  that is, in additioin to Norton's security and pricing, CONVENIANCE.

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Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

And to add another two cents worth, the old Add-On-Pack's (AOP) copy of Confidential Information Blocker (CIB) didn't need routine updates from Norton's.  It would just need to be revised to work with the latest version of NIS/NAV.  The program just monitored for the information the user provides and stays on the users PC (doesn't it?).   I think the CIB program recommended at least four or five numbers, to help prevent false notices.  It is almost worth going back to NIS 2010, to get back the ability to use the AOP's CIB.  NIS 2011 removes the old CIB version, when NIS/NAV is installed doesn't it?

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Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

Long time users of AOP will recognize that every time you went up a major version of NIS from 09 to 10 or 08 to 09, 08 to 10, etc, you had to reinstall AOP.  You also had to reset your web filtering rules, and re enter your sensitive data.

So yes, you would have to reinstall AOP.

There are 2 problems with this thread.

1) this is the AOP/NIS thread.  Any suggestions for NOF need to be posted in that forum, so the people who work on that product will see and take action with the issues noted

2) I still see people assuming that CIB is doing much more than it actually is.  

The internal consensus within the company is that the technology is old and dated.  The technology has many problems that make support problematic.  The technology is extremely limited in it's capabilities and has not been updated for many years now.  The technology is also not a large vector for threats and because of that, we moved it out from the core of the product in 2006, and later reintroduced as an additional installation for users that wanted parental controls while we bided our time waiting for NOF to mature.

All the new user input on CIB should be directed at NOF.  They already deliver a CIB feature and can really use actual user input for future CIB feature development

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

PC_Confused,

Thanks with pointing out the fact that CIB needs no updates but instead needs to be configured to work with later versions of NIS

Now I'm a bit confused with your 1st question, "The program just monitored for the information the user provides and stays on the users PC (doesn't it?)." The actual CIB info doesn't have to be "stored"on the given computer, itself. But it does have to be saved in the CIB fields. And flags that you'd get would be related to the fields of input rather that what the info actually is. For an example, you could very well put your social security number in the phone# field, CC# field, or in the name field. Those exact #s in the exact sequence(order) will be blocked/notified of. What ever field in CIB you used to describe that #, then that's the flag you'll get. And though CIB recommends using 5-6 numbers, you are not limited to that amount. It's still possible to get false positives even with 5-6#s.(I've experienced just that. And CIB RECOMMENDS 5-6 #, AT LEAST. You could do more, if you saw fit.) I use 7 because I'd get false positives with 5-6. Hope this helps.

And for those who say that CIB doesn't "block" info, to them I say it does. A door lock prevents people from gaining access to your home; but you have to remember to lock the door for it to work. CIB is that "lock". So technically it does block your info, until you choose to unlock it.

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Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?


Marcus wrote:

And for those who say that CIB doesn't "block" info, to them I say it does. A door lock prevents people from gaining access to your home; but you have to remember to lock the door for it to work. CIB is that "lock". So technically it does block your info, until you choose to unlock it.


It does block your sensitive info, but only when you are intentionally trying to send it.  The rest of the time it is only blocking numbers that look like your sensitive info, thus preventing harmless and necessary connections from completing successfully.  Once I realized this, and that the only cache of sensitive information on my hard drive was what I had entered in the Norton program itself, I stopped using Private Information protection.  Sorry, but I really don't see the value in it, as long as you can use other means to keep your kids from giving out their addresses and phone numbers to online strangers.

Kudos0

Re: Whatever happened to Add-On Pack?

With regard to sensitive data, I had a dig round the NIS2011 interface at the weekend and I could not find anywhere to check or enter my CC partial info strings.

Is it a facility now gone ?

Lets be careful out there !

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