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Kudos0

So, what's on the inside?

So has anyone decided to disassemble their Norton router to see what the antenna beamforming array (or other components) looks like under that "radar array" style case?

(disassembly may void warranties and may require a rotary cutting tool if it is closed by plastic welds rather than screws)

On the other hand Symantec/Norton could save someone's warranty and post several screenshots without the case for us.

Respostas

Kudos1 Stats

Re: So, what's on the inside?

Not even a reply? Doesn't anyone want to see if that crazy shape it totally pointless and it's just a normal router with a bunch of empty space in the dome?

Kudos1 Stats

Re: So, what's on the inside?

Most users are not interested in what is inside a device they use. They just want it to work.

Things happen. Export/Backup your Norton Password Manager data.
Kudos1 Stats

Re: So, what's on the inside?

I for one am interested. FCC should have pictures, but you’d have to find the license application for them. I don’t know how to do that.
Kudos1 Stats

Re: So, what's on the inside?

Kudos0

Re: So, what's on the inside?

bjm_:

FWIW ~ https://wikidevi.com/wiki/Norton_Core_517

https://fccid.io/2AI6F-517

 "Country of manuf.: China"

Hmm, I don't like the sound of that.

Windows 10 x64 1903
Kudos0

Re: So, what's on the inside?

Where do you expect stuff like that to be made these days?

Electronics gear has been suffering what began with the textile industry post WW-II when rising labor costs continued the drift southwards from New England through the Carolinas and Alabama to Mexico and then Central America and the Caribbean ..... to Taiwan and Asia in general.

But apart from garment making textile production from fiber to fabric is now so mechanized and automated that labor is becoming a minor part of cost of production, except in garment making. So it is now possible for it to drift back to the USA and the Western World.

This can now happen with electronics with the advantage that even assembly into the final product is automated to a growing extent. Didn't Apple talk about returning manufacture to the USA although I don't know to what extent that has occurred yet.

Hugh
Kudos0

Re: So, what's on the inside?

Why? More than 90% of all electronics in the US are made or assembled in China or somewhere else in Asia including ALL cell phones. Bit late to worry about it now.

Kudos0

Re: So, what's on the inside?

bjm_:

FWIW ~ https://wikidevi.com/wiki/Norton_Core_517

https://fccid.io/2AI6F-517

Thanks. That answered some minor questions. It doesn't seem to support DFS frequencies.

Kudos0

Re: So, what's on the inside?

So I can't convince even one person to (only possibly) ruin their expensive router to satisfy my curiosity?

Kudos0

Re: So, what's on the inside?

Nope.  I guess you are going have to do it.  lol

Kudos0

Re: So, what's on the inside?

Not feeling that stupid to void my warranty just to see the inside. I’ll wait for someone like the experts at iFixit or Small Net Builder to do it first. THEY know how to do that without voiding the warranty.
Kudos0

Re: So, what's on the inside?

They still void the warranty, but to them its worth that. For their reputation & status as a knowledgable site to others, its worth it. Definitely worth it when all the people who visit their sites, look to them for details and info gotten no where else. They get their money back//ADS

DELL XPS 8900 / I7-6700 / 64bit / 16GB RAM Win7 Pro - Norton Security
Kudos0

Re: So, what's on the inside?

MannyT:

Nope.  I guess you are going have to do it.  lol

Don't own one and they have yet to convince me to buy one (either to tear apart and/or use).

Can a current owner examine their device and determine how it is assembled (even without any disassembly attempt)? Find screws, screws hidden under labels (via depressions, not removing the label), plastic weld seams?

Maybe just high quality close up pictures of the unit from various angles?

Kudos0

Re: So, what's on the inside?

Dave_Coleman:

@password_password - See that glow underneath?  That's it's indicator light.  It can change from amber (disconnected) to white (connected). And it can flash to indicate different things.

How do I tell if each LAN port has link and at what speed (10/100/1000Mbps)?

How do I tell if the WAN port has link and at what speed (10/100/1000Mbps)?

How can I tell if there is traffic on any port (including WLAN)?

How can I tell if a firmware update is in progress?

Does the firmware update automatically?
If so what prevents this update from happening at an inopportune time? Such as during a storm when power outages are expected, or as a result of the (in progress) firmware update the connections drop and a user immediately decides to powercycle the router during firmware updating/flashing (not knowing what is going on).
Will this "brick" the router?

What does the router look like on the inside?

Kudos1 Stats

Re: So, what's on the inside?

@password_password - I've moved your reply to your own thread. It's impolite to hijack someone elses thread, taking it off-topic. 

I'm not on the engineering team, I'm just a Symantec employee who happens to have a Norton Core.   So I'm not going to answer all of your questions.  Here's the underside of the Norton Core:

As you can see, it has the usual traffic lights, letting you know about the traffic flowing.  

More information can be found in the Norton Core User Guide. (Although I can tell you right now, all of your questions aren't answered there either.) You are notified on your smart device when your firmware has been updated. 

Kudos0

Re: So, what's on the inside?

Dave_Coleman:

@password_password - I've moved your reply to your own thread. It's impolite to hijack someone elses thread, taking it off-topic. 

I'm not on the engineering team, I'm just a Symantec employee who happens to have a Norton Core.   So I'm not going to answer all of your questions.  Here's the underside of the Norton Core:

As you can see, it has the usual traffic lights, letting you know about the traffic flowing.  

More information can be found in the Norton Core User Guide. (Although I can tell you right now, all of your questions aren't answered there either.) You are notified on your smart device when your firmware has been updated. 

Sure, I was hoping to wander a bit, but not hijack.

Thanks for the picture! I see an odd something above the rightmost ethernet port in the picture... Is it a human pressable reset button or the paperclip kind?

"You are notified on your smart device when your firmware has been updated."

I assume this is after the update is complete and any bricking danger has already passed, right?

Also you have a failed Unicode escaping on page 34 of that PDF "↺".

Kudos0

Re: So, what's on the inside?

Yep, that's the reset button you read about on page 34. It's a human press-able reset.  Hold it for ten seconds, then release it for a Factory reset. 

You are notified of the firmware update AFTER it has been installed.  I can't speak to any bricking danger, that's outside my knowledge. 

I'll let the team know about the:

(↺)
Kudos0

Re: So, what's on the inside?

Dave_Coleman:

You are notified of the firmware update AFTER it has been installed. I can't speak to any bricking danger, that's outside my knowledge.

Well, either it has redundant firmware or the bootloader has some sort of a recovery mode... OR It assumes all firmware updates will be successful and if catastrophically interrupted simply fails unrecoverably (bricked).

One would hope that an expensive router like this which flashes new firmware at times of it's own choosing would have the that kind of protection (or an unlimited warranty).

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